Presentation Title

Management of M. Micrantha in the Mangal Forest of the Mai Po Nature Reserve

Faculty Mentor

Cheryl Swift

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 65

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong provides a case study in ecosystem management, specifically in the management of mangroves. The reserve consists of twenty individual wetlands separated by bunds, these wetlands are known as Gei Wai. They have been modified from man-made shrimp ponds to instead support migratory birds; being intermittently drained one at a time, on a two-week interval, November thru March for this purpose. Recently, several Gei Wai have become invaded with a South American vine (M. Micrantha). This vine climbs into the upper canopy of mangroves and has significant effects on overall mangrove health through the blocking of light availability. To quantify the effects that the vine is having on mangroves; we collected data on stomatal conductance, specific leaf weight, leaf area index and water stress for the two most common species of mangrove in the reserve (Aegiceras corniculatum, Kandelia obovata). We collected this data in three Gei Wais that each are managed for the invasive vine differently; Gei Wai #6 was unmanaged inundated, Gei Wei #12 was managed dry, and finally Gei Wai #13 was uninvaded inundated. We expected that Gei Wai #13 would have the highest levels of stomatal conductance, specific leaf weight, leaf area index as it was uninvaded and lower water stress due to the roots of the mangroves were inundated with water. Gei Wai #6 will have the lowest levels of stomatal conductance but lower water stress than Gei Wei #12 due to the inundation of the roots of the mangroves.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Management of M. Micrantha in the Mangal Forest of the Mai Po Nature Reserve

BSC-Ursa Minor 65

The Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong provides a case study in ecosystem management, specifically in the management of mangroves. The reserve consists of twenty individual wetlands separated by bunds, these wetlands are known as Gei Wai. They have been modified from man-made shrimp ponds to instead support migratory birds; being intermittently drained one at a time, on a two-week interval, November thru March for this purpose. Recently, several Gei Wai have become invaded with a South American vine (M. Micrantha). This vine climbs into the upper canopy of mangroves and has significant effects on overall mangrove health through the blocking of light availability. To quantify the effects that the vine is having on mangroves; we collected data on stomatal conductance, specific leaf weight, leaf area index and water stress for the two most common species of mangrove in the reserve (Aegiceras corniculatum, Kandelia obovata). We collected this data in three Gei Wais that each are managed for the invasive vine differently; Gei Wai #6 was unmanaged inundated, Gei Wei #12 was managed dry, and finally Gei Wai #13 was uninvaded inundated. We expected that Gei Wai #13 would have the highest levels of stomatal conductance, specific leaf weight, leaf area index as it was uninvaded and lower water stress due to the roots of the mangroves were inundated with water. Gei Wai #6 will have the lowest levels of stomatal conductance but lower water stress than Gei Wei #12 due to the inundation of the roots of the mangroves.