Presentation Title

Analyzing Terrorism As A Fear and Human Behavioral Response to Terrorism

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Christine Ann Gordon, Dr. Chris Bader, Dr. Ed Day

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 5

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

After each terrorist attack, the behavior of people and a community can turn to a state of unrest in the span of a few minutes. This can be in the way the media presents and exposes the attack to the public, often in what seems countless hours of explaining “what happened.” However, it seems after each terrorist attack, a new agenda is set by the international community, in the forms of using secret investigation committees such as the FBI and CIA, and special operations forces (SOFs) to find and track any kind of information to prevent the next possible attack. So far, with each terrorist attack, it has become a reality to see higher surveillance at airports, subways, and even public events such as concerts, and movie theaters. Using the Chapman University Survey of American Fears 2016 and 2017, the issue of how human behavior changes in a socioeconomic lens will be explored and understand the limitations of the See Something Say Something campaign nationally established in 2010. Studies suggest people who are exposed to hours of media exposure of a terrorist attack will report to having higher levels of stress, and anxiety and will change their way of living. Findings say the higher levels of stress will lead to two different types of behavior in “coping” with the exposure, one is called avoidance behavior and the second is protective behavior. The paper aims to show how media exposure of a tragic event can change a person's perceived notion of their reality, and if their current living environment is considered as safe. This paper also shows examples of the behaviors people participate to feel safe from a future attack.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Analyzing Terrorism As A Fear and Human Behavioral Response to Terrorism

BSC-Ursa Minor 5

After each terrorist attack, the behavior of people and a community can turn to a state of unrest in the span of a few minutes. This can be in the way the media presents and exposes the attack to the public, often in what seems countless hours of explaining “what happened.” However, it seems after each terrorist attack, a new agenda is set by the international community, in the forms of using secret investigation committees such as the FBI and CIA, and special operations forces (SOFs) to find and track any kind of information to prevent the next possible attack. So far, with each terrorist attack, it has become a reality to see higher surveillance at airports, subways, and even public events such as concerts, and movie theaters. Using the Chapman University Survey of American Fears 2016 and 2017, the issue of how human behavior changes in a socioeconomic lens will be explored and understand the limitations of the See Something Say Something campaign nationally established in 2010. Studies suggest people who are exposed to hours of media exposure of a terrorist attack will report to having higher levels of stress, and anxiety and will change their way of living. Findings say the higher levels of stress will lead to two different types of behavior in “coping” with the exposure, one is called avoidance behavior and the second is protective behavior. The paper aims to show how media exposure of a tragic event can change a person's perceived notion of their reality, and if their current living environment is considered as safe. This paper also shows examples of the behaviors people participate to feel safe from a future attack.