Presentation Title

Nanofabrication of GLAD Structures – A Comparison of Ion and Electron Beam Deposition Techniques

Faculty Mentor

Eva Schubert

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 101

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD) is utilized to grow thin films under an oblique particle flux angle of incidence. Due to mechanisms of atomic shadowing and limited surface diffusion, films exhibit high porosity and are composed of carpet like arrangements of nanostructures. The shape of the nanostructures can be tailored from vertical posts, spirals to slanted columnar structures by applying an appropriate azimuthal substrate rotation. Due to their high porosity, films can be used as platforms in hybrid materials with applications envisioned in sensor technology, photovoltaics, plasmonics or energy storage for example.

In this work we have grown slanted columnar thin films from titanium (Ti) on stationary silicon (Si) substrates using ion beam sputtering (IBS) and electron beam evaporation (EBE) to produce a particle flux which hits the substrate at an angle of approximately 85 degrees. Particle fluxes created by ion beam sputtering and electron evaporation show some significant differences in regard to particle energy distribution, particle flux rate and particle flux angle divergence. We show a comparison between the growth rate, porosity, and slanting angle of the films for different growth methods and parameters. To achieve this data, the deposited films were optically analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry using an RC2. A model containing an ABEMA layer was built and fitted to the experimental data, providing the physical properties of the thin film. The structural properties from the optical analysis were supported by high resolution SEM images.

In conclusion, EBE provides a higher deposition rate than IBS, but the films show a higher porosity and the columnar structures tend to have a more pronounced fanning, limiting the usability and thickness of the film.

Summary of research results to be presented

Electron beam evaporation (EBE) provides a higher deposition rate than ion beam sputtering (IBS), which allows the columnar structures to grow at a quicker rate. Although the EBE films grew at a much quicker rate, these films had a higher porosity and the columnar structures tended to have a much more pronounced fanning than the thin films grown by IBS, which limits the usability and thickness of the film.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Nanofabrication of GLAD Structures – A Comparison of Ion and Electron Beam Deposition Techniques

BSC-Ursa Minor 101

Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD) is utilized to grow thin films under an oblique particle flux angle of incidence. Due to mechanisms of atomic shadowing and limited surface diffusion, films exhibit high porosity and are composed of carpet like arrangements of nanostructures. The shape of the nanostructures can be tailored from vertical posts, spirals to slanted columnar structures by applying an appropriate azimuthal substrate rotation. Due to their high porosity, films can be used as platforms in hybrid materials with applications envisioned in sensor technology, photovoltaics, plasmonics or energy storage for example.

In this work we have grown slanted columnar thin films from titanium (Ti) on stationary silicon (Si) substrates using ion beam sputtering (IBS) and electron beam evaporation (EBE) to produce a particle flux which hits the substrate at an angle of approximately 85 degrees. Particle fluxes created by ion beam sputtering and electron evaporation show some significant differences in regard to particle energy distribution, particle flux rate and particle flux angle divergence. We show a comparison between the growth rate, porosity, and slanting angle of the films for different growth methods and parameters. To achieve this data, the deposited films were optically analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry using an RC2. A model containing an ABEMA layer was built and fitted to the experimental data, providing the physical properties of the thin film. The structural properties from the optical analysis were supported by high resolution SEM images.

In conclusion, EBE provides a higher deposition rate than IBS, but the films show a higher porosity and the columnar structures tend to have a more pronounced fanning, limiting the usability and thickness of the film.