Presentation Title

Parental Norms Play Significant Role in the Sexual Behaviors and Birth Control Use of Young Adult Women

Faculty Mentor

Guadalupe Bacio

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 6

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Women in their late teens and early twenties report the highest rates of unintended pregnancies, affecting approximately 71-106 per 1000 women aged 19-29 (e.g., Finer & Zolna, 2006). Previous literature has found that perceived norms of peers, in regards to unprotected sex, pregnancy, and contraceptive use, influence these behaviors in adolescent girls. While some research has shown that parental approval of birth control and disapproval of sexual behaviors also influence these behaviors among younger ages, there is a gap in knowledge regarding how parental norms impact women aged 19-22. The current study hypothesizes that perceived norms of parents will be associated with sex behaviors and birth control use, or lack thereof, in addition to the effects of perceived norms of peers. Data was obtained from the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life Study conducted at University of Michigan. Linear regression models supported the hypothesis, showing that the norms of both parents and peers significantly affected the likelihood of pregnancy (β = -.178 parents, β = -.131 peers), unprotected sex (β = -.171, β = -.177), and birth control use (β = -.381, β = -.072) in young women. Interestingly, results suggest that perceived parent norms accounted for slighter greater variance on risk behaviors than perceived peer norms. Findings indicate that, when addressing sex behaviors for young adult women, integrating parental factors can be useful when creating relevant educational programs.

Summary of research results to be presented

Young adult women were more likely to report being pregnant or having had unprotected sex in the past if they reported higher perceived approval of these behaviors in their friends. Participants were less likely to report being pregnant or having had unprotected sex in the past if they reported higher perceived disapproval of these behaviors from their parents. Finally, young adult women who reported higher levels of perceived birth control approval from their peers and parents were more likely to use birth control.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Parental Norms Play Significant Role in the Sexual Behaviors and Birth Control Use of Young Adult Women

BSC-Ursa Minor 6

Women in their late teens and early twenties report the highest rates of unintended pregnancies, affecting approximately 71-106 per 1000 women aged 19-29 (e.g., Finer & Zolna, 2006). Previous literature has found that perceived norms of peers, in regards to unprotected sex, pregnancy, and contraceptive use, influence these behaviors in adolescent girls. While some research has shown that parental approval of birth control and disapproval of sexual behaviors also influence these behaviors among younger ages, there is a gap in knowledge regarding how parental norms impact women aged 19-22. The current study hypothesizes that perceived norms of parents will be associated with sex behaviors and birth control use, or lack thereof, in addition to the effects of perceived norms of peers. Data was obtained from the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life Study conducted at University of Michigan. Linear regression models supported the hypothesis, showing that the norms of both parents and peers significantly affected the likelihood of pregnancy (β = -.178 parents, β = -.131 peers), unprotected sex (β = -.171, β = -.177), and birth control use (β = -.381, β = -.072) in young women. Interestingly, results suggest that perceived parent norms accounted for slighter greater variance on risk behaviors than perceived peer norms. Findings indicate that, when addressing sex behaviors for young adult women, integrating parental factors can be useful when creating relevant educational programs.