Presentation Title

Patient Retention Challenges in a Ugandan Antiretroviral Treatment Program

Faculty Mentor

Richard Mora

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 27

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Key Words: Uganda, health, HIV, antiretroviral treatment, retention, care dissatisfaction

According to the Prevention Gap Report, nearly 28,000 Ugandans died of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related illnesses. While Uganda has seen an overall decline for people diagnosed with AIDS due to antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs, limited research has looked into the factors affecting patient retention. In this study, I sought to determine patient level factors influencing retention of clients enrolled in the ART program at St. Francis Health Care Services, a non-governmental organization in Uganda.

To identify these factors, I interviewed, with a translator, 20 participants and conducted three focus group discussions with a total of 25 subjects. Moreover, the same questionnaire was used in both methods. Participants received 10,000 to 15,000 schillings as travel compensation. Focus group participants received snacks and refreshments during the sessions. Additionally, interpreters were compensated 15,000 schillings and the driver was compensated 30,000 schillings per day.

The major themes uncovered during participant responses included social factors; care dissatisfaction; health factors; and socioeconomic factors. Social factors relating to stigmatization, social networks, relationships, education, work, and child-care responsibilities played a large role in patient retention. More generally, socioeconomic factors pertaining to transport costs and income, along with health factors dealing with nutrition and additional illnesses, were contributors to low-levels of retention. Inadequate treatment by staff, speed of receiving treatment, and lack of amenities all gave rise to care dissatisfaction. Proposed recommendations for improving retention rates involve sensitizing communities about HIV through the preforming arts and educating schools about the negative effects of rumor mongering and debunking myths.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Patient Retention Challenges in a Ugandan Antiretroviral Treatment Program

BSC-Ursa Minor 27

Key Words: Uganda, health, HIV, antiretroviral treatment, retention, care dissatisfaction

According to the Prevention Gap Report, nearly 28,000 Ugandans died of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related illnesses. While Uganda has seen an overall decline for people diagnosed with AIDS due to antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs, limited research has looked into the factors affecting patient retention. In this study, I sought to determine patient level factors influencing retention of clients enrolled in the ART program at St. Francis Health Care Services, a non-governmental organization in Uganda.

To identify these factors, I interviewed, with a translator, 20 participants and conducted three focus group discussions with a total of 25 subjects. Moreover, the same questionnaire was used in both methods. Participants received 10,000 to 15,000 schillings as travel compensation. Focus group participants received snacks and refreshments during the sessions. Additionally, interpreters were compensated 15,000 schillings and the driver was compensated 30,000 schillings per day.

The major themes uncovered during participant responses included social factors; care dissatisfaction; health factors; and socioeconomic factors. Social factors relating to stigmatization, social networks, relationships, education, work, and child-care responsibilities played a large role in patient retention. More generally, socioeconomic factors pertaining to transport costs and income, along with health factors dealing with nutrition and additional illnesses, were contributors to low-levels of retention. Inadequate treatment by staff, speed of receiving treatment, and lack of amenities all gave rise to care dissatisfaction. Proposed recommendations for improving retention rates involve sensitizing communities about HIV through the preforming arts and educating schools about the negative effects of rumor mongering and debunking myths.