Presentation Title

Assistive Technology Education and Training for Individuals with SCI

Faculty Mentor

Jerome Garcia

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 109

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

There are approximately 17,000 new spinal cord injury (SCI) cases annually in the United States. The effects a spinal cord injury has on a person’s life should be analyzed through multiple points of view, rather than just physiologically. People with traumatic injuries to their spinal cord often experience a decreased sense of independence, lowered levels of communication with the outside world, and a decreased quality of life (QOL) when compared to pre-SCI levels. Technology use in recent years has increased in accords with the technological revolution, yet modern technology is seldom adapted to SCI patients. For such reasons, specialized assistive technology (AT) has emerged as a means to increase the QOL and level of independence for SCI patients. Through the use of a grant by the Craig Nelson Foundation, an AT lab was set up at Casa Colina Hospital. In the AT lab, SCI patients were introduced to several types of assistive technology through a series of eight therapy sessions led by a licensed PT and an assistive technology team. A return to normal living (RNLI) index, as well as a pre and post quality of life survey were administered to collect data regarding the SCI patients level or independence and QOL. A change was observed in the quality of life of individuals with a SCI, including aspects such as mobility in the wheelchair, independence, communication abilities, as well at the ability to return to school. Overall, it was concluded that the introduction of AT has a positive impact on spinal cord injury patient’s quality of life.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Assistive Technology Education and Training for Individuals with SCI

BSC-Ursa Minor 109

There are approximately 17,000 new spinal cord injury (SCI) cases annually in the United States. The effects a spinal cord injury has on a person’s life should be analyzed through multiple points of view, rather than just physiologically. People with traumatic injuries to their spinal cord often experience a decreased sense of independence, lowered levels of communication with the outside world, and a decreased quality of life (QOL) when compared to pre-SCI levels. Technology use in recent years has increased in accords with the technological revolution, yet modern technology is seldom adapted to SCI patients. For such reasons, specialized assistive technology (AT) has emerged as a means to increase the QOL and level of independence for SCI patients. Through the use of a grant by the Craig Nelson Foundation, an AT lab was set up at Casa Colina Hospital. In the AT lab, SCI patients were introduced to several types of assistive technology through a series of eight therapy sessions led by a licensed PT and an assistive technology team. A return to normal living (RNLI) index, as well as a pre and post quality of life survey were administered to collect data regarding the SCI patients level or independence and QOL. A change was observed in the quality of life of individuals with a SCI, including aspects such as mobility in the wheelchair, independence, communication abilities, as well at the ability to return to school. Overall, it was concluded that the introduction of AT has a positive impact on spinal cord injury patient’s quality of life.