Presentation Title

Resources and Physical Activity Affect on Infants' Motor Development

Faculty Mentor

Do Kyeong Lee

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 111

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Infants with limited access to resources are at risk for developmental delays in motor and cognitive regulation. Little is known about whether access to resources affects locomotor development during infancy. In study 1, we determined whether access to resources affects the onset of locomotor milestones (e.g., crawling, cruising, or walking) and proficiency of crawling and walking. We measured 129 infants at 10, 13, 15, and 19 months of age (one third of infants were tested at multiple time). Infants in the high-resource group had higher SES scores (Hollingshead Index), compared with infants in the low-resource group. With parents’ retrospective reports, we found that infants in the high-resource group achieved motor milestones at a much earlier age than those with low-resource infants. Low-resource infants achieved each form of locomotion at later ages, but their rate of improvement was similar to infants in the high-resource group.

Study 2 investigated whether access to resources affects toddler’s physical activity. We observed the level of physical activity during 20 minutes for free play in a laboratory playroom. The level of physical activity was scored from videos and included time in upright motion, accumulated walking steps, and total area visited. Preliminary data showed that low-resource infants move less, took fewer steps, and visited fewer areas of the playroom. The importance of discovering the actual factor that influences locomotor development is that it would help in the prevention of delays and cease any secondary effects it may cause.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Resources and Physical Activity Affect on Infants' Motor Development

BSC-Ursa Minor 111

Infants with limited access to resources are at risk for developmental delays in motor and cognitive regulation. Little is known about whether access to resources affects locomotor development during infancy. In study 1, we determined whether access to resources affects the onset of locomotor milestones (e.g., crawling, cruising, or walking) and proficiency of crawling and walking. We measured 129 infants at 10, 13, 15, and 19 months of age (one third of infants were tested at multiple time). Infants in the high-resource group had higher SES scores (Hollingshead Index), compared with infants in the low-resource group. With parents’ retrospective reports, we found that infants in the high-resource group achieved motor milestones at a much earlier age than those with low-resource infants. Low-resource infants achieved each form of locomotion at later ages, but their rate of improvement was similar to infants in the high-resource group.

Study 2 investigated whether access to resources affects toddler’s physical activity. We observed the level of physical activity during 20 minutes for free play in a laboratory playroom. The level of physical activity was scored from videos and included time in upright motion, accumulated walking steps, and total area visited. Preliminary data showed that low-resource infants move less, took fewer steps, and visited fewer areas of the playroom. The importance of discovering the actual factor that influences locomotor development is that it would help in the prevention of delays and cease any secondary effects it may cause.