Presentation Title

The Impact of an Informal Weekend Research Experience on Undergraduates’ and High School Students’ Perceptions of Knowledge of Science and STEM Persistence

Presenter Information

Travis TaniguchiFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Barbara L. Gonzalez

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 139

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Authentic research is an example of a high impact practice, which studies report lead to student success and persistence in STEM majors. Most studies have focused on formal research experiences embedded in academic courses or summer programs. This study explored the impact of informal weekend research experiences for high school students and undergraduates on their perceptions of knowledge of science and STEM persistence. The subjects (n = 98) of the study were participants in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute funded weekend research experience from 2012-2016 at a primarily undergraduate institution in Southern California. Data were collected before and after the weekend experience by means of Likert-style surveys. The questions studied were: 1) Is there a statistically significant difference of the total mean Likert scores for the pre/post survey of student perception of their knowledge? 2) Is there a statistically significant difference of the total mean Likert scores for pre/post survey of student perception of STEM persistence? 3) Is there a statistically significant difference of the mean ranking of perceptions of knowledge and STEM persistence between undergraduates and high school students on the post survey? Data were transcribed from written surveys to a digital spreadsheet. Statistical analyses included the non-parametric Wilcoxin Signed Ranked and Mann-Whitney tests. There was a significant difference in the change of student perception of knowledge (z = 3.63, n = 23, p < 0.05). There was a not a significant difference in the change of student perception of STEM persistence. There was a significant difference of the mean in the change of student perception of knowledge (z = 3.04, n = 96, p < 0.05) and not a significant difference of perception of STEM persistence between undergraduates and high school students. This study implies that the positive impact of short authentic research experience may be beneficial early in the school curriculum.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

The Impact of an Informal Weekend Research Experience on Undergraduates’ and High School Students’ Perceptions of Knowledge of Science and STEM Persistence

BSC-Ursa Minor 139

Authentic research is an example of a high impact practice, which studies report lead to student success and persistence in STEM majors. Most studies have focused on formal research experiences embedded in academic courses or summer programs. This study explored the impact of informal weekend research experiences for high school students and undergraduates on their perceptions of knowledge of science and STEM persistence. The subjects (n = 98) of the study were participants in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute funded weekend research experience from 2012-2016 at a primarily undergraduate institution in Southern California. Data were collected before and after the weekend experience by means of Likert-style surveys. The questions studied were: 1) Is there a statistically significant difference of the total mean Likert scores for the pre/post survey of student perception of their knowledge? 2) Is there a statistically significant difference of the total mean Likert scores for pre/post survey of student perception of STEM persistence? 3) Is there a statistically significant difference of the mean ranking of perceptions of knowledge and STEM persistence between undergraduates and high school students on the post survey? Data were transcribed from written surveys to a digital spreadsheet. Statistical analyses included the non-parametric Wilcoxin Signed Ranked and Mann-Whitney tests. There was a significant difference in the change of student perception of knowledge (z = 3.63, n = 23, p < 0.05). There was a not a significant difference in the change of student perception of STEM persistence. There was a significant difference of the mean in the change of student perception of knowledge (z = 3.04, n = 96, p < 0.05) and not a significant difference of perception of STEM persistence between undergraduates and high school students. This study implies that the positive impact of short authentic research experience may be beneficial early in the school curriculum.