Presentation Title

Body Composition

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Patricia Van Oosbree, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences, Whittier College

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 120

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, over 64% of Americans are classified as overweight or obese. Accurately measuring body composition is critical because of the known association of excess body fat with a number of chronic diseases. Body Mass Index (BMI) is often used by public health agencies as a primary method for assessing overall health for the general population. However, when differentiating between an individual’s fat mass and fat-free mass, calculating BMI does not provide this type of meaningful information for health assessment. There are quick and relatively easy methods available for evaluating body fat deposition (%BF) which can be used to provide a more accurate determination of overweight and obesity rates. This study compared three body composition assessment techniques: Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA) using Tanita SC-240 body analyzer, BIA using Tantia BC-418 lower body/upper body segment analyzer, and Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP) using Cosmed BodPod. A second question investigated in this study relates to lifestyle factors linked to higher levels of body adiposity. There is conclusive evidence that lack of physical activity correlates with higher %BF but it remains unclear if daily sleeping and eating patterns directly contribute to weight gain. Twenty college-aged female subjects participated in the three body composition measurements and responded to four questions related to the average number of hours of sleep they received each night and how regularly they eat breakfast each week. Statistical analyses did not yield significant differences (p >0.05) between the variables. There were trends that both methods of BIA resulted in lower %BF compared to the ADP; those who slept 7-9 hours/night had slightly lower %BF than those who slept 6 hours or less; similarly, those who ate breakfast 5-7 mornings/week had lower %BF than those who at breakfast 4 or fewer days/week. Speculating on the trends found in this study, perhaps a larger sample size of 100 or more subjects would result in levels of significance, especially in the comparisons of body composition assessment techniques. The study did conclude however that body composition measurements between the Bod Pod and Tanita-418 had no significant difference (p=2.001), indicating that perhaps the Tanita could replace the Bod Pod in certain settings as an similarly accurate and more affordable substitute for body composition measurement.

Summary of research results to be presented

Statistical analyses did not yield significant differences (p >0.05) between the variables. The p value for comparison between Tanita-240 and the Bod Pod of < 0.083 suggests that the Tanita is trending toward a significant difference between the two devices suggesting Tanita-240 would not provide accurate body composition data. Comparison of Tanita 418 and the Pod Bod yielded a p value of 0.2001 suggesting they are not significantly different and that the Tanita-418 could be useful in a clinical setting. The comparisons between sleep hours per night and the regularity of eating breakfast per week did not yield significant differences (p values of 0.8339 and 0.2922 , respectively). These results could be a reflection on the small sample size of this study and perhaps a larger sample size of 100 or more subjects would result in levels of significance.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Body Composition

BSC-Ursa Minor 120

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, over 64% of Americans are classified as overweight or obese. Accurately measuring body composition is critical because of the known association of excess body fat with a number of chronic diseases. Body Mass Index (BMI) is often used by public health agencies as a primary method for assessing overall health for the general population. However, when differentiating between an individual’s fat mass and fat-free mass, calculating BMI does not provide this type of meaningful information for health assessment. There are quick and relatively easy methods available for evaluating body fat deposition (%BF) which can be used to provide a more accurate determination of overweight and obesity rates. This study compared three body composition assessment techniques: Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA) using Tanita SC-240 body analyzer, BIA using Tantia BC-418 lower body/upper body segment analyzer, and Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP) using Cosmed BodPod. A second question investigated in this study relates to lifestyle factors linked to higher levels of body adiposity. There is conclusive evidence that lack of physical activity correlates with higher %BF but it remains unclear if daily sleeping and eating patterns directly contribute to weight gain. Twenty college-aged female subjects participated in the three body composition measurements and responded to four questions related to the average number of hours of sleep they received each night and how regularly they eat breakfast each week. Statistical analyses did not yield significant differences (p >0.05) between the variables. There were trends that both methods of BIA resulted in lower %BF compared to the ADP; those who slept 7-9 hours/night had slightly lower %BF than those who slept 6 hours or less; similarly, those who ate breakfast 5-7 mornings/week had lower %BF than those who at breakfast 4 or fewer days/week. Speculating on the trends found in this study, perhaps a larger sample size of 100 or more subjects would result in levels of significance, especially in the comparisons of body composition assessment techniques. The study did conclude however that body composition measurements between the Bod Pod and Tanita-418 had no significant difference (p=2.001), indicating that perhaps the Tanita could replace the Bod Pod in certain settings as an similarly accurate and more affordable substitute for body composition measurement.