Presentation Title

The Impact of Undergraduate Research Experience: A Focus on Special Consideration Students

Presenter Information

Cindy SandovalFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Barbara Gonzalez

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 143

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

High impact practices (HIPs), such as research experience, are increasingly a focus in the education system. Studies report that students’ understanding and retention of subject matter is enhanced by HIPs experiences. This study explores a summer research experience for undergraduates (N=16) funded by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) from 2013-2015. Some of the participants reported one or more special consideration (SC) categories. SC include underrepresented minority, the first person in the family to attend college, a financially disadvantaged student, or as someone who attended a high school with a low graduation rate. Increasing the inclusion of underrepresented groups in STEM would more accurately represent the changing population in the United States. The purpose of this study is to profile the differences between SC students their non-SC peers. In this study, a quasi-experimental mixed methods approach was used to explore participants’ scientific epistemology. The online self-report surveys combined items from the Science Attitude Inventory, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience, and open-end response items into one online survey that was administered pre- and post- the eight-week summer experience each year. This study aimed to assess whether: 1) exposure to undergraduate research increased SC students’ interest in pursuing graduate school, 2) if scientific epistemology of SC students differs from those who do not identify as SC, and 3) whether SC students’ learning gains differ from their peers as measured by the SURE+. Preliminary results indicate that SC students showed an interest in furthering their education. Results show a trend that SC students have a lower level of agreement with positive epistemological believes as compared to their peers. Preliminary results show differences in learning gain rankings between SC and non-SC students. This study shows that integration of a research experience may enhance epistemological beliefs of students and may impress positive attributes on special consideration students.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

The Impact of Undergraduate Research Experience: A Focus on Special Consideration Students

BSC-Ursa Minor 143

High impact practices (HIPs), such as research experience, are increasingly a focus in the education system. Studies report that students’ understanding and retention of subject matter is enhanced by HIPs experiences. This study explores a summer research experience for undergraduates (N=16) funded by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) from 2013-2015. Some of the participants reported one or more special consideration (SC) categories. SC include underrepresented minority, the first person in the family to attend college, a financially disadvantaged student, or as someone who attended a high school with a low graduation rate. Increasing the inclusion of underrepresented groups in STEM would more accurately represent the changing population in the United States. The purpose of this study is to profile the differences between SC students their non-SC peers. In this study, a quasi-experimental mixed methods approach was used to explore participants’ scientific epistemology. The online self-report surveys combined items from the Science Attitude Inventory, the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience, and open-end response items into one online survey that was administered pre- and post- the eight-week summer experience each year. This study aimed to assess whether: 1) exposure to undergraduate research increased SC students’ interest in pursuing graduate school, 2) if scientific epistemology of SC students differs from those who do not identify as SC, and 3) whether SC students’ learning gains differ from their peers as measured by the SURE+. Preliminary results indicate that SC students showed an interest in furthering their education. Results show a trend that SC students have a lower level of agreement with positive epistemological believes as compared to their peers. Preliminary results show differences in learning gain rankings between SC and non-SC students. This study shows that integration of a research experience may enhance epistemological beliefs of students and may impress positive attributes on special consideration students.