Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Parent-Child Conversational Turns and Child Vocalizations in English and Bilingual Speaking Families

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kim

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 112

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

This study examines the relationships among the amount of adult words, parent-child conversational turns, and spontaneous child vocalizations in typically-developing English-speaking and Spanish-speaking children between 1 and 3 years old. The purpose of this study is to 1) evaluate language environment effect on these children’s speech development from a large amount of natural and spontaneous language data; and 2) investigate if cultural differences exist between the two populations. Research has reported that qualitative and quantitative language exposure including adult words and parent-child conversation turns is related to the amount of child’s vocalization. Cultural differences in parental language behaviors may influence infants’ linguistic development. However, few studies have investigated a large amount of spontaneous language samples in children from different language groups. Eight typically-developing children between 1-3 years and their caregivers participated in the study. English speaking children (n=4) and Spanish speaking children (n=4) were given a small digital recorder (LENA language processing device) each to record the child’s daily routines for up to 16 hours per day at home. A total of 3 days of recordings were collected from each child. Parents also filled out a vocabulary checklist (MacArthur Bates test) to document total number of words each child could pronounce verbally. Recordings were analyzed with the LENA software to quantify parent and child speech productions. Results reveal a strong correlation between parent-child conversational turns and child vocalizations in both groups. Results also reveal cultural differences in parent-child interactions and the impact on child vocalizations and vocabulary development. This study discusses a possible clinical application of these findings.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

The Relationship Between Parent-Child Conversational Turns and Child Vocalizations in English and Bilingual Speaking Families

BSC-Ursa Minor 112

This study examines the relationships among the amount of adult words, parent-child conversational turns, and spontaneous child vocalizations in typically-developing English-speaking and Spanish-speaking children between 1 and 3 years old. The purpose of this study is to 1) evaluate language environment effect on these children’s speech development from a large amount of natural and spontaneous language data; and 2) investigate if cultural differences exist between the two populations. Research has reported that qualitative and quantitative language exposure including adult words and parent-child conversation turns is related to the amount of child’s vocalization. Cultural differences in parental language behaviors may influence infants’ linguistic development. However, few studies have investigated a large amount of spontaneous language samples in children from different language groups. Eight typically-developing children between 1-3 years and their caregivers participated in the study. English speaking children (n=4) and Spanish speaking children (n=4) were given a small digital recorder (LENA language processing device) each to record the child’s daily routines for up to 16 hours per day at home. A total of 3 days of recordings were collected from each child. Parents also filled out a vocabulary checklist (MacArthur Bates test) to document total number of words each child could pronounce verbally. Recordings were analyzed with the LENA software to quantify parent and child speech productions. Results reveal a strong correlation between parent-child conversational turns and child vocalizations in both groups. Results also reveal cultural differences in parent-child interactions and the impact on child vocalizations and vocabulary development. This study discusses a possible clinical application of these findings.