Presentation Title

Understanding Stress: A Two-Dimensional Analysis of Physiological Response in Mussels

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Geoffrey Dilly

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 77

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Rocky intertidal zones are in a constant state of flux. Sessile intertidal organisms must tolerate a suite of dynamic abiotic conditions: temperature, wave action, pH, hypoxia, and most dramatically, emersion. The duration of emersion also changes daily depending on the tides; additionally, air temperatures shift with diurnal cycles, seasonal differences, and weather conditions. Thus, the West Coast mussel, Mytilus californianus (M.c.), a key indicator species of intertidal community health, must tolerate rapid shifts between a wide variety of submerged and emerged conditional regimes. Our full-factorial study combines phenotypic and genotypic response of M.c. to emersion at a range of environmentally relevant thermal regimes (air: 7, 18, and 35°C; water: 14 and 24°C) and emersion durations (4 and 8 hours) using a custom-designed respirometry system. To conduct in vivo respirometry experiments, we built a customizable isolation system named the Chambers for Organismal Response to Environmental Stressors (CORES) to interface with a NeoFox spectrophotometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, Fl). This low-cost, novel system allows for continuous non-invasive measurement of dissolved oxygen on marine invertebrates. We then quantify expression in key genes associated with metabolism, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and heat shock response using RT-qPCR. Through the coupling of these two methods a multidimensional analysis of physiological response is attained.

Summary of research results to be presented

Our full factorial study on the physiological effects of water temperature and emersion time on Mytilus Californianus concluded that as water temperature increases respiration rates increase. We also observed a slight torpor on organisms exposed to above thermal neutral zone stress. Emersion periods did not seem to metabolically hinder these organisms. qPCR data correlated with these respirometric experiments will also be presented to comprehend the effects of emersion on gene expression of genes associated with stress response in the California mussel.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Understanding Stress: A Two-Dimensional Analysis of Physiological Response in Mussels

BSC-Ursa Minor 77

Rocky intertidal zones are in a constant state of flux. Sessile intertidal organisms must tolerate a suite of dynamic abiotic conditions: temperature, wave action, pH, hypoxia, and most dramatically, emersion. The duration of emersion also changes daily depending on the tides; additionally, air temperatures shift with diurnal cycles, seasonal differences, and weather conditions. Thus, the West Coast mussel, Mytilus californianus (M.c.), a key indicator species of intertidal community health, must tolerate rapid shifts between a wide variety of submerged and emerged conditional regimes. Our full-factorial study combines phenotypic and genotypic response of M.c. to emersion at a range of environmentally relevant thermal regimes (air: 7, 18, and 35°C; water: 14 and 24°C) and emersion durations (4 and 8 hours) using a custom-designed respirometry system. To conduct in vivo respirometry experiments, we built a customizable isolation system named the Chambers for Organismal Response to Environmental Stressors (CORES) to interface with a NeoFox spectrophotometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, Fl). This low-cost, novel system allows for continuous non-invasive measurement of dissolved oxygen on marine invertebrates. We then quantify expression in key genes associated with metabolism, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and heat shock response using RT-qPCR. Through the coupling of these two methods a multidimensional analysis of physiological response is attained.