Presentation Title

Understanding Stress: A Two-Dimensional Analysis of Physiological Response in Mussels

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Geoffrey Dilly

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 77

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Rocky intertidal zones are in a constant state of flux. Sessile intertidal organisms must tolerate a suite of dynamic abiotic conditions: temperature, wave action, pH, hypoxia, and most dramatically, emersion. The duration of emersion also changes daily depending on the tides; additionally, air temperatures shift with diurnal cycles, seasonal differences, and weather conditions. Thus, the West Coast mussel, Mytilus californianus (M.c.), a key indicator species of intertidal community health, must tolerate rapid shifts between a wide variety of submerged and emerged conditional regimes. Our full-factorial study combines phenotypic and genotypic response of M.c. to emersion at a range of environmentally relevant thermal regimes (air: 7, 18, and 35°C; water: 14 and 24°C) and emersion durations (4 and 8 hours) using a custom-designed respirometry system. To conduct in vivo respirometry experiments, we built a customizable isolation system named the Chambers for Organismal Response to Environmental Stressors (CORES) to interface with a NeoFox spectrophotometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, Fl). This low-cost, novel system allows for continuous non-invasive measurement of dissolved oxygen on marine invertebrates. We then quantify expression in key genes associated with metabolism, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and heat shock response using RT-qPCR. Through the coupling of these two methods a multidimensional analysis of physiological response is attained.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Understanding Stress: A Two-Dimensional Analysis of Physiological Response in Mussels

BSC-Ursa Minor 77

Rocky intertidal zones are in a constant state of flux. Sessile intertidal organisms must tolerate a suite of dynamic abiotic conditions: temperature, wave action, pH, hypoxia, and most dramatically, emersion. The duration of emersion also changes daily depending on the tides; additionally, air temperatures shift with diurnal cycles, seasonal differences, and weather conditions. Thus, the West Coast mussel, Mytilus californianus (M.c.), a key indicator species of intertidal community health, must tolerate rapid shifts between a wide variety of submerged and emerged conditional regimes. Our full-factorial study combines phenotypic and genotypic response of M.c. to emersion at a range of environmentally relevant thermal regimes (air: 7, 18, and 35°C; water: 14 and 24°C) and emersion durations (4 and 8 hours) using a custom-designed respirometry system. To conduct in vivo respirometry experiments, we built a customizable isolation system named the Chambers for Organismal Response to Environmental Stressors (CORES) to interface with a NeoFox spectrophotometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, Fl). This low-cost, novel system allows for continuous non-invasive measurement of dissolved oxygen on marine invertebrates. We then quantify expression in key genes associated with metabolism, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and heat shock response using RT-qPCR. Through the coupling of these two methods a multidimensional analysis of physiological response is attained.