Presentation Title

Vitamin B6 and Tryptophan’s Effect on Discontinuation Symptoms

Faculty Mentor

Erica A. Fradinger, Sylvia A. Vetrone

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 103

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Sciences

Vitamin B6 and Tryptophan’s Effect on Discontinuation Symptoms

Author: Hannah D. Brozowski, Whittier College

Mentor: Erica A. Fradinger, PhD., Biology Department, Whittier College; Sylvia A. Vetrone, PhD., Biology Department, Whittier College

Depression is a worldwide disease that affects millions of individuals and debilitates their ability to regulate mood. Anti-depressant medications are often prescribed, however once the medication regime ends, many individuals experience debilitating discontinuation symptoms. Unfortunately, it is difficult to predict a patient’s susceptibility to these symptoms, therefore research is needed to help elucidate susceptibility and also find strategies to lower the prevalence and overall chance of experiencing discontinuation symptoms. Tryptophan supplements directly effect serotonin levels, a neurotransmitter that effects mood and behavior, by generating and regulating serotonin. Vitamin B6 also helps your body make serotonin and some researchers believe that vitamin B6 might help reduce symptoms for depression. In this study, we investigated the ability of two naturally occurring chemicals, tryptophan and vitamin B6, to reduce symptoms of stress and effect behavior in Danio rerio (zebra fish) that had previously been treated with the anti-depressant, sertraline. Briefly, zebra fish were treated with sertraline for 15 days, and switched to either tryptophan or vitamin B6 for a period of 3 days. The fish where then assessed using the Novel Tank Dive and the Novel Light-Dark plus maze to analyze behavior associated with anxiety by studying their erratic and static movements in response to the aforementioned tests. Our preliminary findings indicate that vitamin B6 exposed fish demonstrated less anxious behavior while performing these tests than those exposed to Tryptophan, or vitamin B6 and tryptophan combined. While these results are promising, more trials are underway to determine if there is a statistical correlation that vitamin B6 can help reduce behavior associated with discontinuation symptoms in a positive manner.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Vitamin B6 and Tryptophan’s Effect on Discontinuation Symptoms

BSC-Ursa Minor 103

Sciences

Vitamin B6 and Tryptophan’s Effect on Discontinuation Symptoms

Author: Hannah D. Brozowski, Whittier College

Mentor: Erica A. Fradinger, PhD., Biology Department, Whittier College; Sylvia A. Vetrone, PhD., Biology Department, Whittier College

Depression is a worldwide disease that affects millions of individuals and debilitates their ability to regulate mood. Anti-depressant medications are often prescribed, however once the medication regime ends, many individuals experience debilitating discontinuation symptoms. Unfortunately, it is difficult to predict a patient’s susceptibility to these symptoms, therefore research is needed to help elucidate susceptibility and also find strategies to lower the prevalence and overall chance of experiencing discontinuation symptoms. Tryptophan supplements directly effect serotonin levels, a neurotransmitter that effects mood and behavior, by generating and regulating serotonin. Vitamin B6 also helps your body make serotonin and some researchers believe that vitamin B6 might help reduce symptoms for depression. In this study, we investigated the ability of two naturally occurring chemicals, tryptophan and vitamin B6, to reduce symptoms of stress and effect behavior in Danio rerio (zebra fish) that had previously been treated with the anti-depressant, sertraline. Briefly, zebra fish were treated with sertraline for 15 days, and switched to either tryptophan or vitamin B6 for a period of 3 days. The fish where then assessed using the Novel Tank Dive and the Novel Light-Dark plus maze to analyze behavior associated with anxiety by studying their erratic and static movements in response to the aforementioned tests. Our preliminary findings indicate that vitamin B6 exposed fish demonstrated less anxious behavior while performing these tests than those exposed to Tryptophan, or vitamin B6 and tryptophan combined. While these results are promising, more trials are underway to determine if there is a statistical correlation that vitamin B6 can help reduce behavior associated with discontinuation symptoms in a positive manner.