Presentation Title

WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING WITH REPETITIVE INTERVAL MUSCULOSKELETAL LOADING ON BONE IN YOUNG WOMEN

Faculty Mentor

Michael T. Liang, Alexandra Auslander

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 84

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

INTRODUCTION. Osteoporosis is a medical condition characterized by a continuous loss of bone tissue. Although pharmacologic treatments are available, they are not always effective and may produce unwanted side effects. In both animal and human studies, non-pharmacologic treatments have been shown to induce bone formation. There is, however, a lack of knowledge on the effects of low-magnitude high-frequency whole-body vibration (WBV) training on bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), lean mass and fat mass in young adult women. This study tested the hypothesis that four weeks of WBV training can improve BMD and BMC in adult women. METHOD. Healthy women (n=26), age 18-31 years, volunteer as study subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two study groups. Group 1 (EXP, n=11) performed 4 bouts of 5-min per bout WBV training, each bout followed by a 1-min rest period for a total of 20 min per day. The WBV exercises were performed 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Group 2 was a no-training control group (CON, n=15). The EXP group was trained using a whole body vibration platform (DKN Technology, CA) with a vibration magnitude of 3 g and frequency of 40 Hz. RESULTS. The exercise group showed no significant increase at week 4 in BMD, BMC, lean mass and fat mass, compared to the CON. Between the pre-and post-training measurements, there was no significant change in femoral shaft strength parameters as well as BMC or BMD at all bone sites. DISCUSSION. Our results indicate that a four-week WBV training does not induce osteogenic changes in BMD or BMC at all regions of interest. Increase the number of repetitive bone loading intervals and/or the number of training week may be needed to induce osteogenic adaptation in healthy women.

Summary of research results to be presented

RESULTS. The exercise group showed no significant increase at week 4 in BMD, BMC, lean mass and fat mass, compared to the CON. Between the pre-and post-training measurements, there was no significant change in femoral shaft strength parameters as well as BMC or BMD at all bone sites. Our results indicate that a four-week WBV training does not induce osteogenic changes in BMD or BMC at all regions of interest. Increase the number of repetitive bone loading intervals and/or the number of training week may be needed to induce osteogenic adaptation in healthy women.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRAINING WITH REPETITIVE INTERVAL MUSCULOSKELETAL LOADING ON BONE IN YOUNG WOMEN

BSC-Ursa Minor 84

INTRODUCTION. Osteoporosis is a medical condition characterized by a continuous loss of bone tissue. Although pharmacologic treatments are available, they are not always effective and may produce unwanted side effects. In both animal and human studies, non-pharmacologic treatments have been shown to induce bone formation. There is, however, a lack of knowledge on the effects of low-magnitude high-frequency whole-body vibration (WBV) training on bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), lean mass and fat mass in young adult women. This study tested the hypothesis that four weeks of WBV training can improve BMD and BMC in adult women. METHOD. Healthy women (n=26), age 18-31 years, volunteer as study subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two study groups. Group 1 (EXP, n=11) performed 4 bouts of 5-min per bout WBV training, each bout followed by a 1-min rest period for a total of 20 min per day. The WBV exercises were performed 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Group 2 was a no-training control group (CON, n=15). The EXP group was trained using a whole body vibration platform (DKN Technology, CA) with a vibration magnitude of 3 g and frequency of 40 Hz. RESULTS. The exercise group showed no significant increase at week 4 in BMD, BMC, lean mass and fat mass, compared to the CON. Between the pre-and post-training measurements, there was no significant change in femoral shaft strength parameters as well as BMC or BMD at all bone sites. DISCUSSION. Our results indicate that a four-week WBV training does not induce osteogenic changes in BMD or BMC at all regions of interest. Increase the number of repetitive bone loading intervals and/or the number of training week may be needed to induce osteogenic adaptation in healthy women.