Presentation Title

You are what you eat: Folate and depression

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Archana McEligot, Dr. Sam Behseta, Dr. Janice Pogoda

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 102

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Multiple studies have examined the relationship between dietary folate intakes and depression. Low dietary folate intakes have been associated with increased depression outcomes, and poor response to antidepressants. A Cochrane review on depression indicated folate as a potential addition to other treatments for depression, although whether this applies to both people with normal folate levels and those with folate deficiency is unclear. The present study examined the association between dietary folate status and depression, as well as whether folate supplementation might be helpful in conjunction with other treatment. Methods involve correlational analyses and univariate logistic regressions of folate intakes and depression variables found within a nationally-representative open-source big dataset measuring the health and nutritional status of the U.S. population. Preliminary correlational analyses suggest a negative relationship between dietary folate intake and depressive symptoms (r = -0.079). Additionally, a logistic regression was performed to further examine dietary folate and its relationship with depression, when accounting for energy (OR = 0.64, p < 0.001). Therefore, for every one unit increase in folate consumption, depressive symptoms are reduced by 36%. These data suggest that increasing a diet high in folate, dark green leafy vegetables, may reduce depressive symptoms, but further analyses utilizing multivariate techniques, as well as adjusting for multicollinearity are necessary to strengthen these findings.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

You are what you eat: Folate and depression

BSC-Ursa Minor 102

Multiple studies have examined the relationship between dietary folate intakes and depression. Low dietary folate intakes have been associated with increased depression outcomes, and poor response to antidepressants. A Cochrane review on depression indicated folate as a potential addition to other treatments for depression, although whether this applies to both people with normal folate levels and those with folate deficiency is unclear. The present study examined the association between dietary folate status and depression, as well as whether folate supplementation might be helpful in conjunction with other treatment. Methods involve correlational analyses and univariate logistic regressions of folate intakes and depression variables found within a nationally-representative open-source big dataset measuring the health and nutritional status of the U.S. population. Preliminary correlational analyses suggest a negative relationship between dietary folate intake and depressive symptoms (r = -0.079). Additionally, a logistic regression was performed to further examine dietary folate and its relationship with depression, when accounting for energy (OR = 0.64, p < 0.001). Therefore, for every one unit increase in folate consumption, depressive symptoms are reduced by 36%. These data suggest that increasing a diet high in folate, dark green leafy vegetables, may reduce depressive symptoms, but further analyses utilizing multivariate techniques, as well as adjusting for multicollinearity are necessary to strengthen these findings.