Presentation Title

Can erosion control and fog capture screens help overcome barriers to plant succession on Santa Rosa Island, CA?

Presenter Information

Jamie MasukawaFollow

Faculty Mentor

Brett D. Hartman

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 125

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Over 150 years of non-native ungulate grazing induced severe erosion on Santa Rosa Island (SRI). In many cases, ridgelines were denuded down to the bedrock or regolith. As part of passive restoration efforts, all sheep, cattle, and feral pigs were removed from the island by 1998, and non-native mule deer and Roosevelt elk were removed by 2011. This allowed vegetation to recover, with dramatic increases in scrub, chaparral and woodland vegetation. However, approximately 5.4 km2 of bare ground remain. Long-term changes in bare ground were evaluated on SRI through the use and analysis of historic aerial images (1929-2012) in a GIS, and it has been determined that active restoration is required to restore coastal scrub and island oak woodlands on bare ridgelines on SRI. A restoration management prescription includes the use of natural fiber wattles and check dams to reduce erosion, promote sediment accumulation, and it allows for the establishment of native plant species. Fog capture devices allow for the collection of soil moisture data that will provide insight into ecosystem health. The management prescription is not only important to the recovery of Santa Rosa Island ecosystems, but it can also be applied to mainland areas experiencing similar restoration challenges.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Can erosion control and fog capture screens help overcome barriers to plant succession on Santa Rosa Island, CA?

BSC-Ursa Minor 125

Over 150 years of non-native ungulate grazing induced severe erosion on Santa Rosa Island (SRI). In many cases, ridgelines were denuded down to the bedrock or regolith. As part of passive restoration efforts, all sheep, cattle, and feral pigs were removed from the island by 1998, and non-native mule deer and Roosevelt elk were removed by 2011. This allowed vegetation to recover, with dramatic increases in scrub, chaparral and woodland vegetation. However, approximately 5.4 km2 of bare ground remain. Long-term changes in bare ground were evaluated on SRI through the use and analysis of historic aerial images (1929-2012) in a GIS, and it has been determined that active restoration is required to restore coastal scrub and island oak woodlands on bare ridgelines on SRI. A restoration management prescription includes the use of natural fiber wattles and check dams to reduce erosion, promote sediment accumulation, and it allows for the establishment of native plant species. Fog capture devices allow for the collection of soil moisture data that will provide insight into ecosystem health. The management prescription is not only important to the recovery of Santa Rosa Island ecosystems, but it can also be applied to mainland areas experiencing similar restoration challenges.