Presentation Title

Caregiver’s perceptions on client needs in the United States and South Korea

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Namhee Kim

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 110

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

This study examines the perceptions of caregivers working in institutionalized care facilities that support children with special needs in the United States and in South Korea. The purpose of the study is to investigate 1) the characteristics of caregivers’ perceptions on client needs, caregiver roles, and resource accessibility; and 2) if there is any cultural difference in perceptions between these two groups. Research has reported that the caregivers’ perceptions is critical to determine the quality of services for the children in their facilities. Research has also reported that the perceptions and views of children’s needs may vary across cultures. Improved understanding of cultural characteristics of caregivers’ perceptions would benefit from providing appropriate support for caregivers to strengthen their capacities. Few studies have explored the cultural characteristics in caregivers’ perceptions. Caregivers (n=20) who work in group homes in Southern California, and caregivers (n=20) working in a South Korean orphanage completed a written form of a 29-item questionnaire survey anonymously. Results revealed how the caregivers viewed their roles, their client’s needs, and the training and resources available to them. Results also revealed a difference between how the American caregivers viewed their clients with special needs and how the South Korean caregivers regarded their clients. This study discusses possible clinical implications of culturally appropriate caregiver training.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Caregiver’s perceptions on client needs in the United States and South Korea

BSC-Ursa Minor 110

This study examines the perceptions of caregivers working in institutionalized care facilities that support children with special needs in the United States and in South Korea. The purpose of the study is to investigate 1) the characteristics of caregivers’ perceptions on client needs, caregiver roles, and resource accessibility; and 2) if there is any cultural difference in perceptions between these two groups. Research has reported that the caregivers’ perceptions is critical to determine the quality of services for the children in their facilities. Research has also reported that the perceptions and views of children’s needs may vary across cultures. Improved understanding of cultural characteristics of caregivers’ perceptions would benefit from providing appropriate support for caregivers to strengthen their capacities. Few studies have explored the cultural characteristics in caregivers’ perceptions. Caregivers (n=20) who work in group homes in Southern California, and caregivers (n=20) working in a South Korean orphanage completed a written form of a 29-item questionnaire survey anonymously. Results revealed how the caregivers viewed their roles, their client’s needs, and the training and resources available to them. Results also revealed a difference between how the American caregivers viewed their clients with special needs and how the South Korean caregivers regarded their clients. This study discusses possible clinical implications of culturally appropriate caregiver training.