Presentation Title

Classification of Hyperluminous X-ray Source Candidates

Faculty Mentor

Fiona Harrison, Marianne Heida, Daniel Stern

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 16

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Hyperluminous X-ray sources (HLXs) are extragalactic sources with bolometric luminosities >1041 erg/s that are located in a galaxy, but outside of its nucleus and they are candidates for intermediate mass black holes (midsize black holes with masses between 102 - 106 M).Intermediate mass black holes would serve as the bridge between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes and should, in theory, exist, but there is little evidence of them.

The goal of this project was to classify spectra of HLX candidatesand measure their redshifts to ensure that they are in the galaxy they appear to be in. To do this, I reduced spectroscopic data of a sample of potential HLXs that were selected using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 and observed with Keck/DEIMOS. The next stepwill be to identify the most promising HLX candidates for follow-up studies, including Palomar and Keck spectroscopy.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Classification of Hyperluminous X-ray Source Candidates

BSC-Ursa Minor 16

Hyperluminous X-ray sources (HLXs) are extragalactic sources with bolometric luminosities >1041 erg/s that are located in a galaxy, but outside of its nucleus and they are candidates for intermediate mass black holes (midsize black holes with masses between 102 - 106 M).Intermediate mass black holes would serve as the bridge between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes and should, in theory, exist, but there is little evidence of them.

The goal of this project was to classify spectra of HLX candidatesand measure their redshifts to ensure that they are in the galaxy they appear to be in. To do this, I reduced spectroscopic data of a sample of potential HLXs that were selected using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 and observed with Keck/DEIMOS. The next stepwill be to identify the most promising HLX candidates for follow-up studies, including Palomar and Keck spectroscopy.