Presentation Title

Comparing Classroom Interactions in Los Angeles and Mexico City

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Angela Gallegos, Dr. Anna Bargagliotti

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 145

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

While more people are paying attention the implementation of state standards and state exams, it is also important to examine their effects in the classrooms on both, the teachers and the students. The purpose of this Undergraduate Research Project was to compare the different teaching methods and classroom interactions in Elementary schools in Los Angeles and Mexico City. Both of these large cities are home to migrating families from other states and countries. For this reason, it is important study how teachers in these cities have adapted to the state content standards and curriculum. In order to do this, we observed a total of 7 elementary schools. Five schools in the Greater Los Angeles area and two schools in Mexico City. At each school, we observed a math lesson being taught, then asked a series of questions to the teachers through an interview. We found cross cultural differences in teacher attitudes, classroom set-up, and teaching styles in both Mexico City and the greater Los Angeles area. While teaching styles and methods differed cross-culturally between both cities and in Los Angeles alone, classroom set-up differences were obvious in the comparison of both cities.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Comparing Classroom Interactions in Los Angeles and Mexico City

BSC-Ursa Minor 145

While more people are paying attention the implementation of state standards and state exams, it is also important to examine their effects in the classrooms on both, the teachers and the students. The purpose of this Undergraduate Research Project was to compare the different teaching methods and classroom interactions in Elementary schools in Los Angeles and Mexico City. Both of these large cities are home to migrating families from other states and countries. For this reason, it is important study how teachers in these cities have adapted to the state content standards and curriculum. In order to do this, we observed a total of 7 elementary schools. Five schools in the Greater Los Angeles area and two schools in Mexico City. At each school, we observed a math lesson being taught, then asked a series of questions to the teachers through an interview. We found cross cultural differences in teacher attitudes, classroom set-up, and teaching styles in both Mexico City and the greater Los Angeles area. While teaching styles and methods differed cross-culturally between both cities and in Los Angeles alone, classroom set-up differences were obvious in the comparison of both cities.