Presentation Title

Determination of the Prevalence of Major Mastitis-Causing Pathogens in California Dairy Farms Using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

Faculty Mentor

Shelton Murinda

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 88

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Background

The U.S. dairy industry in 2012 garnered $35.5 billion and California had $6.9 in milk sales. This industry is in constant jeopardy as a result of mastitis, a disease characterized by inflammation of the mammary gland. Bovine mastitis accounts for $1.8 billion per year and the cost per cow per year is $80. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of major mastitis-causing pathogens (i.e., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus species) isolated from bovine quarter milk (QM) samples in California dairy farms (San Bernardino Co.) and compare it with current prevalence trends. The data will determine if control methods or antibiotics utilized before can still be applied today. The study uses multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (mPCR) to identify the major mastitis pathogens present in QM samples (n = 293). The PCR protocol combines S. aureus, E. coli, and three Streptococcus sp. pathogen-specific primers.

Hypothesis

The predominant causative agent of mastitis is Staphylococcus aureus in dairy operations, with a prevalence of ~43%. In this study, it is expected for S. aureus to be the predominate mastitis causative agent present in contaminated QM samples.

Preliminary Results

A total of 169 milk samples have been tested with the multiplex PCR assay. 94 (56%) were positive for E.coli, 22 (13%) for S. aureus, 11 (6.5%) for more than one species, and 42 (25%) had no bacterial contamination. Our findings indicate that the environmental pathogen E.coli, has a higher prevalence in QM samples isolated from bovine milk.

Summary of research results to be presented

Preliminary Results

A total of 169 milk samples have been tested with the multiplex PCR assay. 94 (56%) were positive for E.coli, 22 (13%) for S. aureus, 11 (6.5%) for more than one species, and 42 (25%) had no bacterial contamination. Our findings indicate that the environmental pathogen E.coli, has a higher prevalence in QM samples isolated from bovine milk.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Determination of the Prevalence of Major Mastitis-Causing Pathogens in California Dairy Farms Using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

BSC-Ursa Minor 88

Background

The U.S. dairy industry in 2012 garnered $35.5 billion and California had $6.9 in milk sales. This industry is in constant jeopardy as a result of mastitis, a disease characterized by inflammation of the mammary gland. Bovine mastitis accounts for $1.8 billion per year and the cost per cow per year is $80. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of major mastitis-causing pathogens (i.e., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus species) isolated from bovine quarter milk (QM) samples in California dairy farms (San Bernardino Co.) and compare it with current prevalence trends. The data will determine if control methods or antibiotics utilized before can still be applied today. The study uses multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (mPCR) to identify the major mastitis pathogens present in QM samples (n = 293). The PCR protocol combines S. aureus, E. coli, and three Streptococcus sp. pathogen-specific primers.

Hypothesis

The predominant causative agent of mastitis is Staphylococcus aureus in dairy operations, with a prevalence of ~43%. In this study, it is expected for S. aureus to be the predominate mastitis causative agent present in contaminated QM samples.

Preliminary Results

A total of 169 milk samples have been tested with the multiplex PCR assay. 94 (56%) were positive for E.coli, 22 (13%) for S. aureus, 11 (6.5%) for more than one species, and 42 (25%) had no bacterial contamination. Our findings indicate that the environmental pathogen E.coli, has a higher prevalence in QM samples isolated from bovine milk.