Presentation Title

Do Diet Carbonated Soft Drinkers Have Better Diet Quality? Evidence from WWEIA, NHANES (2005-2012).

Faculty Mentor

Pimbucha Rusmevichientong, Archana McEligot, Sinjini Mitra

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 101

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

This study focuses on the differences in diet quality among different types of carbonated soft drinkers by age and weight categories. We used data from two non-consecutive days of dietary intake using 24-hour recalls of 36,877 subjects from What We Eat in America (WWEIA) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) over a period of 8 years (2005-2012). Respondents who reported having at least one beverage in each two non-consecutive days were included, and respondents who reported having mixed types of carbonated soft drinks in each two non-consecutive days were excluded. Three types of carbonated soft drinkers were created: sweetened, diet, and non-carbonated. The Nutrition Quality Index (NQI) was used to measure the level of diet quality. For each individual, the NQI was computed from the harmonic mean of the Intake Quality Score (IQS) of 13 nutrients that include: protein, vitamins A, C, E and B-12, calcium, iron, zinc, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, and potassium. The dataset was adjusted based on sample weighting and was analyzed using statistical tools like Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Our results indicate that diet carbonated soft drinkers have better diet quality overall when compared with sweetened carbonated soft drinkers and non-carbonated soft drinkers across the weight and age categories. Interestingly, the only exception to these results was present in the young age group of 5-17 years, where the average NQI of diet carbonated soft drinkers is lower.

Summary of research results to be presented

Our results indicate that diet carbonated drinkers have better diet quality overall when compared with sweetened carbonated drinkers and non-carbonate drinkers, as the NQIs for the diet carbonated beverage drinker group was typically higher across the weight and age categories. More specifically, our results show that the Nutrition Quality Indexes (NQI) of sweetened carbonated beverage drinkers are less than that of diet carbonated drinkers among the normal weight, overweight, and obese categories across all age groups, except for the young age group of 5-17 years. Furthermore, the NQIs of non-carbonated beverage drinkers are less than that of diet carbonated beverage drinkers, except in the young, underweight group. In general, the NQIs are not significantly different between sweetened and non-carbonated beverage drinkers, except among the underweight and normal weight groups for participants in the middle age group of 36-55 years. In order to analyze our data, the ANOVA was used to compare the average level of NQI among the three different categories of carbonated beverage drinkers, weight status, and age groups.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Do Diet Carbonated Soft Drinkers Have Better Diet Quality? Evidence from WWEIA, NHANES (2005-2012).

BSC-Ursa Minor 101

This study focuses on the differences in diet quality among different types of carbonated soft drinkers by age and weight categories. We used data from two non-consecutive days of dietary intake using 24-hour recalls of 36,877 subjects from What We Eat in America (WWEIA) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) over a period of 8 years (2005-2012). Respondents who reported having at least one beverage in each two non-consecutive days were included, and respondents who reported having mixed types of carbonated soft drinks in each two non-consecutive days were excluded. Three types of carbonated soft drinkers were created: sweetened, diet, and non-carbonated. The Nutrition Quality Index (NQI) was used to measure the level of diet quality. For each individual, the NQI was computed from the harmonic mean of the Intake Quality Score (IQS) of 13 nutrients that include: protein, vitamins A, C, E and B-12, calcium, iron, zinc, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, and potassium. The dataset was adjusted based on sample weighting and was analyzed using statistical tools like Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Our results indicate that diet carbonated soft drinkers have better diet quality overall when compared with sweetened carbonated soft drinkers and non-carbonated soft drinkers across the weight and age categories. Interestingly, the only exception to these results was present in the young age group of 5-17 years, where the average NQI of diet carbonated soft drinkers is lower.