Presentation Title

Aerial and aquatic metabolism in littoral isopod crustaceans

Faculty Mentor

Jonathan Wright

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 70

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Aerial and aquatic metabolism in littoral isopod crustaceans

Isopods of the sub-order Oniscidea have successfully adapted to life in many different terrestrial environments. Several species inhabit the marine littoral and are regularly submerged by waves or during high tides. The respiration structures differ between species and some are better adapted to submersion then others. All oniscideans possess 5 pairs of flattened, ventral appendages, the pleopods, which serve as the main organs of gas exchange. This research looked at the respiratory capacity of six different marine littoral oniscidean species, and one freshwater littoral species, in both lab air and when submerged in water. Generally, it was found that most species showed a decrease in VCO2 and VO2 when submerged. The exceptions were the two species from the basal family Ligiidae, Ligia occidentalis (marine) and Ligidium lapetum (freshwater) both of which possess thin pleopods, minimally modified relative to those of fully aquatic, marine isopods. All species tested survived in water for at least seven hours. The sand-burrowing specialist, Tylos punctatus, is much less permeable than the other species studied and possesses 4 pairs of invaginated pleopodal lungs. In order to examine how such a highly-modified structure might still function for aquatic respiration, we examined the lung ultrastructure using SEM. This revealed an extensive plastron surrounding the ventral spiracles. We propose that this serves to maintain a large air film, contiguous with the lung cavity, during immersion allowing the lung to transform into a physical gill.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Aerial and aquatic metabolism in littoral isopod crustaceans

BSC-Ursa Minor 70

Aerial and aquatic metabolism in littoral isopod crustaceans

Isopods of the sub-order Oniscidea have successfully adapted to life in many different terrestrial environments. Several species inhabit the marine littoral and are regularly submerged by waves or during high tides. The respiration structures differ between species and some are better adapted to submersion then others. All oniscideans possess 5 pairs of flattened, ventral appendages, the pleopods, which serve as the main organs of gas exchange. This research looked at the respiratory capacity of six different marine littoral oniscidean species, and one freshwater littoral species, in both lab air and when submerged in water. Generally, it was found that most species showed a decrease in VCO2 and VO2 when submerged. The exceptions were the two species from the basal family Ligiidae, Ligia occidentalis (marine) and Ligidium lapetum (freshwater) both of which possess thin pleopods, minimally modified relative to those of fully aquatic, marine isopods. All species tested survived in water for at least seven hours. The sand-burrowing specialist, Tylos punctatus, is much less permeable than the other species studied and possesses 4 pairs of invaginated pleopodal lungs. In order to examine how such a highly-modified structure might still function for aquatic respiration, we examined the lung ultrastructure using SEM. This revealed an extensive plastron surrounding the ventral spiracles. We propose that this serves to maintain a large air film, contiguous with the lung cavity, during immersion allowing the lung to transform into a physical gill.