Presentation Title

Effects of Oregano Oil on Bacterial Infections

Faculty Mentor

Sylvia Vetrone

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 87

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Common bacterial infections can often be mistaken as the common cold. Specifically, infections with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) present with fever, cough, and body aches, all common cold symptoms. Of these bacteria, S. Aureus and S. Pyogenes are gram-positive containing a very thick peptidoglycan cell wall. PA14, on the other hand, is a gram-negative bacterium with its peptidoglycan cell wall found between two other protective cell membranes. Interestingly, oregano has been touted for its antibacterial properties, all the way back to ancient greek medicine, where it was believed to hold antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. Today oregano tea is a common house remedy given to those who have cold-like symptoms, as it immediately soothes any discomforts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of oregano oil (a more concentrated version of tea) on S. aureus, S. pyogenes, and PA14. Using a disc diffusion assay, we compared the inhibition zones created by oregano oil to bleach, ethanol, and water. Our findings show that while exposure of S. aureus and S. pyogenes to oregano oil produced similar zones of inhibition to that of bleach exposure that were significantly larger compared to water, this was not true for PA14, which only produced zones in the presence of bleach. These findings suggest that oregano oil appears to have antibacterial properties for gram positive bacteria but not gram negative bacteria, that carry an extra protective cell membrane layer.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Effects of Oregano Oil on Bacterial Infections

BSC-Ursa Minor 87

Common bacterial infections can often be mistaken as the common cold. Specifically, infections with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) present with fever, cough, and body aches, all common cold symptoms. Of these bacteria, S. Aureus and S. Pyogenes are gram-positive containing a very thick peptidoglycan cell wall. PA14, on the other hand, is a gram-negative bacterium with its peptidoglycan cell wall found between two other protective cell membranes. Interestingly, oregano has been touted for its antibacterial properties, all the way back to ancient greek medicine, where it was believed to hold antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. Today oregano tea is a common house remedy given to those who have cold-like symptoms, as it immediately soothes any discomforts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of oregano oil (a more concentrated version of tea) on S. aureus, S. pyogenes, and PA14. Using a disc diffusion assay, we compared the inhibition zones created by oregano oil to bleach, ethanol, and water. Our findings show that while exposure of S. aureus and S. pyogenes to oregano oil produced similar zones of inhibition to that of bleach exposure that were significantly larger compared to water, this was not true for PA14, which only produced zones in the presence of bleach. These findings suggest that oregano oil appears to have antibacterial properties for gram positive bacteria but not gram negative bacteria, that carry an extra protective cell membrane layer.