Presentation Title

Enhancing students’ preparedness: Applying Novak’s theory of Meaningful Learning through the utilization of virtual videos in a general chemistry laboratory

Faculty Mentor

Sachel M. Villafañe

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 142

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

According to Novak’s Theory of Meaningful Learning, there is a constructive integration of thinking, feeling, and acting for meaningful learning to occur. In the laboratory setting, students take part in the psychomotor (acting) of learning; while there is an expectation that students will be constructing knowledge (cognitive domain) and having a positive experience (affective domain) toward learning. Thus, lab experiences must allow for students to construct their knowledge through experiences and engaging in the learning process. However, in many instances, students feel overwhelmed by the different tasks that they need to accomplish during lab. To help students be more prepared, a set of online prelab materials including videos and preparation exercises, were developed. The goal of this study is to assess students’ expectations and the effectiveness of these materials. Three sections of a second semester general chemistry lab participated in this study during Spring 2017. One section was assigned to the intervention group, which have accessed to the online prelab materials; while the other two sections were assigned to the control group. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was given to students at the beginning and the end of the semester to examine changes in students’ expectations. Descriptive statistics, paired sample t-test, and Cohen’s d effect size were used to analyze the data. Two students’ open-ended surveys were administered online to assess the effectiveness of the prelab materials. The results suggest a significant change in students’ cognitive expectations with a medium effect size. In terms of effectiveness of the prelab materials, the analyzed data suggests that most of the students in the intervention group found the online video to be very helpful; while students in the control group found lab manual to be the most helpful. Results from these analyses, implications and future directions will be discussed.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Enhancing students’ preparedness: Applying Novak’s theory of Meaningful Learning through the utilization of virtual videos in a general chemistry laboratory

BSC-Ursa Minor 142

According to Novak’s Theory of Meaningful Learning, there is a constructive integration of thinking, feeling, and acting for meaningful learning to occur. In the laboratory setting, students take part in the psychomotor (acting) of learning; while there is an expectation that students will be constructing knowledge (cognitive domain) and having a positive experience (affective domain) toward learning. Thus, lab experiences must allow for students to construct their knowledge through experiences and engaging in the learning process. However, in many instances, students feel overwhelmed by the different tasks that they need to accomplish during lab. To help students be more prepared, a set of online prelab materials including videos and preparation exercises, were developed. The goal of this study is to assess students’ expectations and the effectiveness of these materials. Three sections of a second semester general chemistry lab participated in this study during Spring 2017. One section was assigned to the intervention group, which have accessed to the online prelab materials; while the other two sections were assigned to the control group. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was given to students at the beginning and the end of the semester to examine changes in students’ expectations. Descriptive statistics, paired sample t-test, and Cohen’s d effect size were used to analyze the data. Two students’ open-ended surveys were administered online to assess the effectiveness of the prelab materials. The results suggest a significant change in students’ cognitive expectations with a medium effect size. In terms of effectiveness of the prelab materials, the analyzed data suggests that most of the students in the intervention group found the online video to be very helpful; while students in the control group found lab manual to be the most helpful. Results from these analyses, implications and future directions will be discussed.