Presentation Title

Enzyme Involved in Cell Wall Biosynthesis Affects EPS Production and Motility

Faculty Mentor

Shelley Thai

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 79

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

A new genus, Paraburkholderia, was recently created to separate the members of the Burkholderia species that are not commonly associated with human infection. This new genus includes the species P. unamae, a gram-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive bacterium. Its cells are straight rods with either a single flagellum or a polar tuft of four to eight flagella. This is a unique species because it is an N-2 fixing rhizospheric and endophytic species and thus plays a vital role in agriculture. In this project, P. unamae genes were randomly mutated with a transposable element. Two phenotypes, expression of exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and motility, were observed and the genes responsible for these mutations were identified. Through the process of conjugation, the employed transposable element, Tn5-RL27, was transferred from E. coli to P. unamae. 416 mutants were then screened and one mutant with over-EPS production and low motility was selected. Through the use of molecular methods, the gene that was disrupted by the transposon were identified. The mutant, PR2.46, contained a disruption of glycosyltransferase that is involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Further analysis must be done to provide a better understanding of the relationship between the disrupted gene and the observed phenotypes.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Enzyme Involved in Cell Wall Biosynthesis Affects EPS Production and Motility

BSC-Ursa Minor 79

A new genus, Paraburkholderia, was recently created to separate the members of the Burkholderia species that are not commonly associated with human infection. This new genus includes the species P. unamae, a gram-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive bacterium. Its cells are straight rods with either a single flagellum or a polar tuft of four to eight flagella. This is a unique species because it is an N-2 fixing rhizospheric and endophytic species and thus plays a vital role in agriculture. In this project, P. unamae genes were randomly mutated with a transposable element. Two phenotypes, expression of exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and motility, were observed and the genes responsible for these mutations were identified. Through the process of conjugation, the employed transposable element, Tn5-RL27, was transferred from E. coli to P. unamae. 416 mutants were then screened and one mutant with over-EPS production and low motility was selected. Through the use of molecular methods, the gene that was disrupted by the transposon were identified. The mutant, PR2.46, contained a disruption of glycosyltransferase that is involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Further analysis must be done to provide a better understanding of the relationship between the disrupted gene and the observed phenotypes.