Presentation Title

Establishing Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to study antimicrobial lipid function in the Innate Immune System

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Edith Porter

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 71

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Antimicrobial lipids are an emergent field in immunology. Bodily fluids, such as nasal fluid possess number of these lipids, including cholesteryl esters, which may be increased when infection is present. Cholesteryl esters (CE’s) are generated by the esterification of a fatty acid residue to a cholesterol molecule by the enzyme Sterol O-acyltransferase 1 (SOAT1). A major goal is understanding the relative contribution of CE’s to the inherent antimicrobial activity of the innate immune response. A significant role could be attributed to CE’s if there was a reduction in the antimicrobial activity in their absence. Prior attempts to selectively inhibit the production of CE’s by blocking gene expression of SOAT1 in a human epithelial cell culture model have failed. Drosophila melanogaster will be a new approach that possesses a similar innate immune system, in addition to possessing a gene homolog to human SOAT1. In this study we wished to establish an antimicrobial assay that would allow us to measure the effect of SOAT1 knock-down in the macrophage-like D. melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells on antimicrobial activity. Biofilm assays were used to establish a baseline for biofilm formation in fresh and S2 cell conditioned culture medium; including S2 cells with SOAT1 silenced via dsRNAi. Results indicate serum free media had the most biofilm formation when compared to the growth control (TSB) and serum-based media. Future directions will be to employ this assay to compare biofilm formation for control S2 cells and gene silenced S2 cells. This study was supported by NIH GM061331.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Establishing Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to study antimicrobial lipid function in the Innate Immune System

BSC-Ursa Minor 71

Antimicrobial lipids are an emergent field in immunology. Bodily fluids, such as nasal fluid possess number of these lipids, including cholesteryl esters, which may be increased when infection is present. Cholesteryl esters (CE’s) are generated by the esterification of a fatty acid residue to a cholesterol molecule by the enzyme Sterol O-acyltransferase 1 (SOAT1). A major goal is understanding the relative contribution of CE’s to the inherent antimicrobial activity of the innate immune response. A significant role could be attributed to CE’s if there was a reduction in the antimicrobial activity in their absence. Prior attempts to selectively inhibit the production of CE’s by blocking gene expression of SOAT1 in a human epithelial cell culture model have failed. Drosophila melanogaster will be a new approach that possesses a similar innate immune system, in addition to possessing a gene homolog to human SOAT1. In this study we wished to establish an antimicrobial assay that would allow us to measure the effect of SOAT1 knock-down in the macrophage-like D. melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells on antimicrobial activity. Biofilm assays were used to establish a baseline for biofilm formation in fresh and S2 cell conditioned culture medium; including S2 cells with SOAT1 silenced via dsRNAi. Results indicate serum free media had the most biofilm formation when compared to the growth control (TSB) and serum-based media. Future directions will be to employ this assay to compare biofilm formation for control S2 cells and gene silenced S2 cells. This study was supported by NIH GM061331.