Presentation Title

Evidence that genes on the left side of the X chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster may be able to confer resistance to heavy metals

Faculty Mentor

Dr. M. Catharine McElwain

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 62

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Heavy metals such as Cadmium are common contaminants in urban areas. Drosophila melanogaster is a suitable model for studying selectable resistance. We are studying a D. melanogaster a wild type Berlin that we have selected for over fifty generations, the last twenty-two of which were continuously selected for Cadmium resistance. As of now, the resistant line survives in Cadmium environments of 0.08 mg/mL at a rate of about 80%, while the original Berlin line only survives at under 10%. The usual mechanism for heavy metal resistance in Drosophila is amplification of the Metallothionein gene resulting in sequestration of Cadmium. Although we do not know the mechanism for resistance in our line, it is not sequestration and does not depend on Metallothionein. Data from our lab indicates that this at least some of this resistance is encoded in genes that lie on the X chromosome. In the Fall of 2016 our lab produced recombinant lines either homo- or hemizygous for segments of the X chromosome from the resistant line. Currently, we are characterizing the survival of the recombinant lines constructed. Preliminary data suggests that two of the recombinant lines, carrying forked or vermillion-forked-carnation, demonstrate Cadmium resistance as well. This suggests that the Cadmium resistance gene lies on the left side of this chromosome.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Evidence that genes on the left side of the X chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster may be able to confer resistance to heavy metals

BSC-Ursa Minor 62

Heavy metals such as Cadmium are common contaminants in urban areas. Drosophila melanogaster is a suitable model for studying selectable resistance. We are studying a D. melanogaster a wild type Berlin that we have selected for over fifty generations, the last twenty-two of which were continuously selected for Cadmium resistance. As of now, the resistant line survives in Cadmium environments of 0.08 mg/mL at a rate of about 80%, while the original Berlin line only survives at under 10%. The usual mechanism for heavy metal resistance in Drosophila is amplification of the Metallothionein gene resulting in sequestration of Cadmium. Although we do not know the mechanism for resistance in our line, it is not sequestration and does not depend on Metallothionein. Data from our lab indicates that this at least some of this resistance is encoded in genes that lie on the X chromosome. In the Fall of 2016 our lab produced recombinant lines either homo- or hemizygous for segments of the X chromosome from the resistant line. Currently, we are characterizing the survival of the recombinant lines constructed. Preliminary data suggests that two of the recombinant lines, carrying forked or vermillion-forked-carnation, demonstrate Cadmium resistance as well. This suggests that the Cadmium resistance gene lies on the left side of this chromosome.