Presentation Title

Geographic Variation with Anna's Hummingbird Song

Presenter Information

Bianca SalazarFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Christopher J. Clark, Dr. Allison Alvarado

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 75

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Geographic Variation with Anna's Hummingbird Song

Author: Bianca Salazar

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Allison Alvarado, Dr. Christopher J. Clark

Adult males of some hummingbird species have the ability to learn an intricate song from other males in the surrounding area. Male Anna’s hummingbirds (Calypte anna) share a general arrangement of syllables and phrases that make up the Anna’s Hummingbird song. Just as human beings share a variety of accents based on region in the country they live, we can take a look at Anna’s hummingbirds and their vocalizations to see if there are any geographic variances with their songs. To test if there was geographic variance in the species’ song, we observed two different locations: University of California, Riverside (UCR) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The distance between the two sites is around 71 miles, which is far enough for physical factors that influence song learning and the production of the songs to differ. TASCAM DR-680 recorder was used to record individual’s songs. The recordings were transcribed with a program called Raven that turns the files into spectrograms; this allowed us to distinguish phrases and syllables within the recited song. We found that the hummingbirds from UCR sing an extra phrase (total of 4 phrases) - that includes 4 syllables - whereas the UCLA birds only sing 3 phrases. Three phrases are the general song syntax for Anna’s Hummingbirds. The two populations share a similar phrase; however, the determining factor that makes the phrases different from one another is the syllables that make up the phrase. Future research will focus on various populations in Ventura county to see what phrases and syllables differ from the UCR and UCLA populations.

Summary of research results to be presented

Adult males of some hummingbird species have the ability to learn an intricate song from other males in the surrounding area. Hummingbirds will perform their songs around breeding season to attract a mate; during the summer is when they practice for breeding season. Male Anna’s hummingbirds (Calypte anna) share a general arrangement of syllables and phrases that make up the Anna’s Hummingbird song. Just as human beings share a variety of accents based on region in the country they live, we can take a look at Anna’s hummingbirds and their vocalizations to see if there are any geographic variances with their songs. We found that the hummingbirds from UCR sing an extra phrase (total of 4 phrases) - that includes 4 syllables - whereas the UCLA birds only sing 3 phrases. Three phrases are the general song syntax for Anna’s Hummingbirds. The two populations share a similar phrase; however, the determining factor that makes the phrases different from one another is the syllables that make up the phrase. Future research will focus on various populations in Ventura county to see what phrases and syllables differ from the UCR and UCLA populations.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Geographic Variation with Anna's Hummingbird Song

BSC-Ursa Minor 75

Geographic Variation with Anna's Hummingbird Song

Author: Bianca Salazar

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Allison Alvarado, Dr. Christopher J. Clark

Adult males of some hummingbird species have the ability to learn an intricate song from other males in the surrounding area. Male Anna’s hummingbirds (Calypte anna) share a general arrangement of syllables and phrases that make up the Anna’s Hummingbird song. Just as human beings share a variety of accents based on region in the country they live, we can take a look at Anna’s hummingbirds and their vocalizations to see if there are any geographic variances with their songs. To test if there was geographic variance in the species’ song, we observed two different locations: University of California, Riverside (UCR) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The distance between the two sites is around 71 miles, which is far enough for physical factors that influence song learning and the production of the songs to differ. TASCAM DR-680 recorder was used to record individual’s songs. The recordings were transcribed with a program called Raven that turns the files into spectrograms; this allowed us to distinguish phrases and syllables within the recited song. We found that the hummingbirds from UCR sing an extra phrase (total of 4 phrases) - that includes 4 syllables - whereas the UCLA birds only sing 3 phrases. Three phrases are the general song syntax for Anna’s Hummingbirds. The two populations share a similar phrase; however, the determining factor that makes the phrases different from one another is the syllables that make up the phrase. Future research will focus on various populations in Ventura county to see what phrases and syllables differ from the UCR and UCLA populations.