Presentation Title

An Initial Comparison of Pollinator Diversity Between Unmanaged and Native Reseeded Areas Within San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary

Faculty Mentor

Dustin VanOverbeke

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 52

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Both wild and managed bees have experienced steady population declines in recent years – necessitating the need to understand how land management strategies affect native bee abundance and diversity (1). Many studies have been conducted to see whether there is a link between native flora and bee abundance and species richness. Conflicting results indicate the need for more studies. In this study, the relative abundance and species richness of Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, and ants) in a managed, reseeded site is compared to a geographically similar unmanaged site within San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. We hypothesize that native flora will promote higher levels of abundance and species richness in Hymenoptera. With 6 of the 7 weeks processed to the level of insect order, this study is on-going.

Interim results demonstrate an increased abundance of in the Reseeded site over that of the Unmanaged site. Additionally, trap color was shown to have a significant effect on Hymenoptera catch. Surprisingly yellow pan traps, known to generally catch the highest relative abundance of Hymenoptera, experienced the least catch across sites. At this point in our research progress, species richness cannot be determined.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

An Initial Comparison of Pollinator Diversity Between Unmanaged and Native Reseeded Areas Within San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary

BSC-Ursa Minor 52

Both wild and managed bees have experienced steady population declines in recent years – necessitating the need to understand how land management strategies affect native bee abundance and diversity (1). Many studies have been conducted to see whether there is a link between native flora and bee abundance and species richness. Conflicting results indicate the need for more studies. In this study, the relative abundance and species richness of Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, and ants) in a managed, reseeded site is compared to a geographically similar unmanaged site within San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. We hypothesize that native flora will promote higher levels of abundance and species richness in Hymenoptera. With 6 of the 7 weeks processed to the level of insect order, this study is on-going.

Interim results demonstrate an increased abundance of in the Reseeded site over that of the Unmanaged site. Additionally, trap color was shown to have a significant effect on Hymenoptera catch. Surprisingly yellow pan traps, known to generally catch the highest relative abundance of Hymenoptera, experienced the least catch across sites. At this point in our research progress, species richness cannot be determined.