Presentation Title

Ground Reaction Force Symmetry in the Sit-To-Stand Movement and the Role of Hip Extensor Strength

Faculty Mentor

LeBlanc, Michele, Ph.D

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 114

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Purpose: Previous research has shown that the sit-to-stand (STS) movement is mechanically demanding, requiring more lower extremity joint torque and range of motion than walking or stair climbing (Berger et al., 1988). The purpose of this study was to investigate the symmetry of STS movement in middle aged adults and to determine if hip muscle strength plays a role in any identified asymmetry. Methods: Healthy adults between the ages of 47 and 70 (6 males, 14 females) performed several STS movements while eight Vantage 5 cameras (200 Hz) and two Kistler force plates (1000 Hz) collected body landmark and 3-dimensional ground reaction force data, respectively. Hip extensor muscle strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer. GRF data was analyzed for the entire STS movement from initiation of hip flexion until the subject was standing upright. Dependent t-tests were used to compare GRF peak and average values between legs defined by strength and preference. Results: There was a difference in the hip extensor strength between the stronger and weaker legs (209.02±53.72 N vs. 190.22±54.66 N; p<0.0001) and a trend between the preferred and non-preferred legs (p = 0.078). Twelve out of the twenty subjects preferred their weaker leg. During the STS movement, subjects had a larger average lateral GRF on their preferred side vs. their non-preferred side (0.215±0.106 N/kg vs. 0.203±0.107 N/kg; p=0.016). Additionally, they had a trend towards larger average lateral GRFs on their weaker side (0.204±0.109 N/kg vs. 0.214±0.104 N/kg; p=0.055). Conclusions: Leg preference and hip extensor strength do not affect vertical GRF values during the STS, but leg preference plays a dominant role in frontal plane GRF values.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Ground Reaction Force Symmetry in the Sit-To-Stand Movement and the Role of Hip Extensor Strength

BSC-Ursa Minor 114

Purpose: Previous research has shown that the sit-to-stand (STS) movement is mechanically demanding, requiring more lower extremity joint torque and range of motion than walking or stair climbing (Berger et al., 1988). The purpose of this study was to investigate the symmetry of STS movement in middle aged adults and to determine if hip muscle strength plays a role in any identified asymmetry. Methods: Healthy adults between the ages of 47 and 70 (6 males, 14 females) performed several STS movements while eight Vantage 5 cameras (200 Hz) and two Kistler force plates (1000 Hz) collected body landmark and 3-dimensional ground reaction force data, respectively. Hip extensor muscle strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer. GRF data was analyzed for the entire STS movement from initiation of hip flexion until the subject was standing upright. Dependent t-tests were used to compare GRF peak and average values between legs defined by strength and preference. Results: There was a difference in the hip extensor strength between the stronger and weaker legs (209.02±53.72 N vs. 190.22±54.66 N; p<0.0001) and a trend between the preferred and non-preferred legs (p = 0.078). Twelve out of the twenty subjects preferred their weaker leg. During the STS movement, subjects had a larger average lateral GRF on their preferred side vs. their non-preferred side (0.215±0.106 N/kg vs. 0.203±0.107 N/kg; p=0.016). Additionally, they had a trend towards larger average lateral GRFs on their weaker side (0.204±0.109 N/kg vs. 0.214±0.104 N/kg; p=0.055). Conclusions: Leg preference and hip extensor strength do not affect vertical GRF values during the STS, but leg preference plays a dominant role in frontal plane GRF values.