Presentation Title

Analysis of Transition Metal Catalyzed Isomerization of Terminal Alkenes

Faculty Mentor

Kevin S. Huang

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 18

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Natural product synthesis is one of the backbones of drug development, and organic synthesis plays a central role in the production of natural products which exhibit health benefits. Creating new carbon-carbon bonds is difficult, however, the 2nd generation Grubbs Catalyst, a ruthenium-containing catalyst, has been shown to facilitate the formation of new carbon-carbon double bonds on terminal alkenes under reflux. Using 5-hexen-2-one in methanol, the 2nd generation Grubbs catalyst was observed to facilitate the isomerization of the terminal alkene to generate 4-hexen-2-one. Separating the product from the heat decomposed 2nd generation Grubbs catalyst proved difficult, making microscale distillation an impractical method of separation for this reaction. However, with these results, natural product synthesis using terminal alkenes as starting materials is a more realistic possibility.

Summary of research results to be presented

“Analysis of Transition Metal Catalyzed Isomerization of Terminal Alkenes”
presents the use of a 2nd generation Grubbs catalyst toward a new synthesis
route. They address both success and challenges of the project which is always
of interest to those in the field.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Analysis of Transition Metal Catalyzed Isomerization of Terminal Alkenes

BSC-Ursa Minor 18

Natural product synthesis is one of the backbones of drug development, and organic synthesis plays a central role in the production of natural products which exhibit health benefits. Creating new carbon-carbon bonds is difficult, however, the 2nd generation Grubbs Catalyst, a ruthenium-containing catalyst, has been shown to facilitate the formation of new carbon-carbon double bonds on terminal alkenes under reflux. Using 5-hexen-2-one in methanol, the 2nd generation Grubbs catalyst was observed to facilitate the isomerization of the terminal alkene to generate 4-hexen-2-one. Separating the product from the heat decomposed 2nd generation Grubbs catalyst proved difficult, making microscale distillation an impractical method of separation for this reaction. However, with these results, natural product synthesis using terminal alkenes as starting materials is a more realistic possibility.