Presentation Title

Kinetics study of water oxidation catalyst using a rotating-disk electrode

Faculty Mentor

Michael Hill

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 19

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

One of the so-called “holy grails” of green energy is the creation of effective hydrogen fuel cells that can generate hydrogen and oxygen from the wastewater of the cell. Given that splitting water is the opposite of the highly energetic combustion of hydrogen, a strong catalyst is necessary for it to be industrially feasible. For this project, the kinetics of a water-oxidation catalyst that has shown significant potential in this area was explored using rotating-disk electrochemistry. By adhering the catalyst to the surface of a glassy-carbon electrode and rotating it at incremental speeds from 16 to 2000 RPM while running cyclic voltammetry from 0.3–1.4 V, we created Levich plots in order to approximate the rate constant of the reaction. Although some of the plots showed the “bending over” phenomenon characteristic of a kinetics-limited process, this result was not reproducible enough to calculate a rate constant, although secondary observations gleaned from the data suggests that the catalyst operates via an as-of-yet unknown two-step mechanism.

Summary of research results to be presented

There aren't all that many results, but Levich plots will be shown with the "bending over" phenomenon mentioned in the abstract, along with a less expected secondary peak that could be indicative of a two step mechanism. There will also be rotated-disk cyclic voltammograms of the catalyst itself.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Kinetics study of water oxidation catalyst using a rotating-disk electrode

BSC-Ursa Minor 19

One of the so-called “holy grails” of green energy is the creation of effective hydrogen fuel cells that can generate hydrogen and oxygen from the wastewater of the cell. Given that splitting water is the opposite of the highly energetic combustion of hydrogen, a strong catalyst is necessary for it to be industrially feasible. For this project, the kinetics of a water-oxidation catalyst that has shown significant potential in this area was explored using rotating-disk electrochemistry. By adhering the catalyst to the surface of a glassy-carbon electrode and rotating it at incremental speeds from 16 to 2000 RPM while running cyclic voltammetry from 0.3–1.4 V, we created Levich plots in order to approximate the rate constant of the reaction. Although some of the plots showed the “bending over” phenomenon characteristic of a kinetics-limited process, this result was not reproducible enough to calculate a rate constant, although secondary observations gleaned from the data suggests that the catalyst operates via an as-of-yet unknown two-step mechanism.