Presentation Title

More Than Just “Ethnic Goods”: Quinceañera Shops and a Narrative of Revival vs. Survival

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Shweta Adur

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 128

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Traditional female migrant work has been studied through the scope of feminized work, body labor or care work. This study focuses on the contributions that Hispanic migrant women have made in ethnic entrepreneurship. Specifically the quinceañera businesses that cater to Latina fifteen year olds taking a rite of passage into womanhood. Many aspects go into planning and celebrating a quinceañera (i.e. dress, accessories, decorations, invitations, etc.) and the market that produces these goods are particularly found in the city of Santa Ana. Santa Ana has grown into an important commercial/business center for the Latin ethnic group, especially Fourth Street with a hub of quinceañera shops and is a prime destination for quinceañera shoppers. Through the use of 12 qualitative interviews with quinceañera shop owners and day to day operational staff, the link between ethnic culture practices and migrant entrepreneurial activities was examined. While Santa Ana does produce a majority of quinceañera goods, the city has been in the trials of ongoing gentrification. The changes caused by gentrification has attracted consumers that are not consuming the goods produced by the quinceañera businesses, thus leading to a downside in ethnic business and cultural practice. This study adds to the stories of migrant women ethnic entrepreneurship practices and the challenges they face in both their personal and professional lives.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

More Than Just “Ethnic Goods”: Quinceañera Shops and a Narrative of Revival vs. Survival

BSC-Ursa Minor 128

Traditional female migrant work has been studied through the scope of feminized work, body labor or care work. This study focuses on the contributions that Hispanic migrant women have made in ethnic entrepreneurship. Specifically the quinceañera businesses that cater to Latina fifteen year olds taking a rite of passage into womanhood. Many aspects go into planning and celebrating a quinceañera (i.e. dress, accessories, decorations, invitations, etc.) and the market that produces these goods are particularly found in the city of Santa Ana. Santa Ana has grown into an important commercial/business center for the Latin ethnic group, especially Fourth Street with a hub of quinceañera shops and is a prime destination for quinceañera shoppers. Through the use of 12 qualitative interviews with quinceañera shop owners and day to day operational staff, the link between ethnic culture practices and migrant entrepreneurial activities was examined. While Santa Ana does produce a majority of quinceañera goods, the city has been in the trials of ongoing gentrification. The changes caused by gentrification has attracted consumers that are not consuming the goods produced by the quinceañera businesses, thus leading to a downside in ethnic business and cultural practice. This study adds to the stories of migrant women ethnic entrepreneurship practices and the challenges they face in both their personal and professional lives.