Presentation Title

Novel Anticoagulants Using Sulfated Dendrons on Virus-like Particles

Faculty Mentor

Andrew K. Udit

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 27

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Heparin is an anticoagulant used to prevent blood clotting. It is prescribed to 1/3 of all hospitalized patients in the U.S. each year, however, up to 15% of these patients experience severe complications related to its use. The dangers associated with heparin are due to the fact that heparin naturally occurs as a heterogeneous mixture, thereby altering its potency. The goal of this research project is to create a safe heparin-alternative through the attachment of sulfated ligands to the surface of a virus-like particle. These sulfated ligands would elicit the same blood-thinning response as heparin, but would eliminate the possibility of accidental overdose. Steps to accomplish this goal include the mutation of the virus, bacteriophage Q in order to enable the attachment of sulfated ligands, the synthesis of multigenerational dendrons that contain sulfation sites, and the attachment of the dendrons to the coat of the virus. The work herein describes the synthesis, and following sulfation of a second-generation dendron in preparation for its attachment to the modified coat proteins of the virus. Following work includes the quantifying of sulfation sites on the virus coat, determining the molecules stability, and evaluating its potency as a heparin-alternative through clotting assays.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Novel Anticoagulants Using Sulfated Dendrons on Virus-like Particles

BSC-Ursa Minor 27

Heparin is an anticoagulant used to prevent blood clotting. It is prescribed to 1/3 of all hospitalized patients in the U.S. each year, however, up to 15% of these patients experience severe complications related to its use. The dangers associated with heparin are due to the fact that heparin naturally occurs as a heterogeneous mixture, thereby altering its potency. The goal of this research project is to create a safe heparin-alternative through the attachment of sulfated ligands to the surface of a virus-like particle. These sulfated ligands would elicit the same blood-thinning response as heparin, but would eliminate the possibility of accidental overdose. Steps to accomplish this goal include the mutation of the virus, bacteriophage Q in order to enable the attachment of sulfated ligands, the synthesis of multigenerational dendrons that contain sulfation sites, and the attachment of the dendrons to the coat of the virus. The work herein describes the synthesis, and following sulfation of a second-generation dendron in preparation for its attachment to the modified coat proteins of the virus. Following work includes the quantifying of sulfation sites on the virus coat, determining the molecules stability, and evaluating its potency as a heparin-alternative through clotting assays.