Presentation Title

Prosthetic biomaterials assessed for biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Faculty Mentor

Steve Alas

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 3:15 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 51

Session

Poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

As the population becomes larger, so does the need for prosthetics used to replace body parts lost to injury or illness. In recent years, an increase in infection during prosthetic implantation has led to more formation of biofilm on human prosthetics. The development of modern biomaterials has resulted in more biocompatible implants, but prosthetics are still susceptible to microbial colonization on their surface. The goal of this project is to test new metal alloys against again colonization by Staphylococcus epidermidis (strain 35984) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain PA01), and identify the new metal that is least susceptible to biofilm formation. In our lab, experimental metal alloys such as commercially pure titanium (CpTi), dental-grade titanium (Ty), titanium based alloy Ti-6V-Al (Ti64), and stainless steel (SS316L) are exposed to the two bacteria. Our first goal was to quantify biofilm propagation on the surface of each metal using a Biofilm reactor and using a crystal violet staining protocol. Metal alloys were placed in the biofilm reactor, with 1mL of overnight bacterial culture added. The biofilm reactor ran at 37 degrees Celsius for 72 hours. Preliminary data shows no significant difference between the metal alloys. Next, we plan to apply a flow of growth media to the biofilm reactor to keep bacteria in log phase over a 72 hour period, to better simulate physiological conditions. In addition, we plan to characterize the viability of the cells (dead/alive) that comprise the biofilm microstructures. To do so, the BacLight staining procedure and fluorescent microscopy will be used.

Summary of research results to be presented

Preliminary data shows no significant difference between the four prosthetic metal alloys when exposed to microbial growth. However, an additional four metal alloys are to be tested and compared to the first four.

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Nov 18th, 2:15 PM Nov 18th, 3:15 PM

Prosthetic biomaterials assessed for biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

BSC-Ursa Minor 51

As the population becomes larger, so does the need for prosthetics used to replace body parts lost to injury or illness. In recent years, an increase in infection during prosthetic implantation has led to more formation of biofilm on human prosthetics. The development of modern biomaterials has resulted in more biocompatible implants, but prosthetics are still susceptible to microbial colonization on their surface. The goal of this project is to test new metal alloys against again colonization by Staphylococcus epidermidis (strain 35984) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain PA01), and identify the new metal that is least susceptible to biofilm formation. In our lab, experimental metal alloys such as commercially pure titanium (CpTi), dental-grade titanium (Ty), titanium based alloy Ti-6V-Al (Ti64), and stainless steel (SS316L) are exposed to the two bacteria. Our first goal was to quantify biofilm propagation on the surface of each metal using a Biofilm reactor and using a crystal violet staining protocol. Metal alloys were placed in the biofilm reactor, with 1mL of overnight bacterial culture added. The biofilm reactor ran at 37 degrees Celsius for 72 hours. Preliminary data shows no significant difference between the metal alloys. Next, we plan to apply a flow of growth media to the biofilm reactor to keep bacteria in log phase over a 72 hour period, to better simulate physiological conditions. In addition, we plan to characterize the viability of the cells (dead/alive) that comprise the biofilm microstructures. To do so, the BacLight staining procedure and fluorescent microscopy will be used.