Presentation Title

DOES IMMIGRANT GENERATION STATUS AND HOUSEHOLD INCOME IMPACT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT?

Faculty Mentor

Gaithri Fernando

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

Location

15-1808

Session

Social Science 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

When immigrants come to this country, their life outcomes and those of later generations are impacted by many factors, including academic achievement. Previous research suggests that variations in household income are associated with academic achievement (measured via GPA). However few studies have examined the role of immigrant generation status on academic achievement. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether academic achievement was related to income and immigrant generation status. College students (N = 353; males = 101, females = 252) between the ages of 17 and 21 years were recruited from an urban university. Participants completed a self-report online questionnaire which assessed GPA, household income, and immigrant generation status. A one-way ANOVA with generation status as the group variable indicated a significant difference in GPA between generational groups, F (3, 302) = 3.38, p< .02. A post hoc test indicated that the significant difference in GPA was between firstand fourthgeneration students. Another one-way ANOVA was conducted with income as the dependent variable, and a similar significant difference was found between immigrant generation groups, F (3, 297) = 6.31, p< .001. However, no association was found between household income and GPA. These results suggest that later generations of students whose families immigrated to the US may achieve greater academic and financial success, but that income alone is unlikely to result in greater academic achievement. Some reasons for the findings will be discussed.

Summary of research results to be presented

A one-way ANOVA with generation status as the group variable indicated a significant difference in GPA between generational groups, F (3, 302) = 3.38, p< .02. A post hoc test indicated that the significant difference in GPA was between firstand fourthgeneration students. Another one-way ANOVA was conducted with income as the dependent variable, and a similar significant difference was found between immigrant generation groups, F (3, 297) = 6.31, p< .001. However, no association was found between household income and GPA.

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Nov 18th, 2:00 PM Nov 18th, 2:15 PM

DOES IMMIGRANT GENERATION STATUS AND HOUSEHOLD INCOME IMPACT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT?

15-1808

When immigrants come to this country, their life outcomes and those of later generations are impacted by many factors, including academic achievement. Previous research suggests that variations in household income are associated with academic achievement (measured via GPA). However few studies have examined the role of immigrant generation status on academic achievement. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether academic achievement was related to income and immigrant generation status. College students (N = 353; males = 101, females = 252) between the ages of 17 and 21 years were recruited from an urban university. Participants completed a self-report online questionnaire which assessed GPA, household income, and immigrant generation status. A one-way ANOVA with generation status as the group variable indicated a significant difference in GPA between generational groups, F (3, 302) = 3.38, p< .02. A post hoc test indicated that the significant difference in GPA was between firstand fourthgeneration students. Another one-way ANOVA was conducted with income as the dependent variable, and a similar significant difference was found between immigrant generation groups, F (3, 297) = 6.31, p< .001. However, no association was found between household income and GPA. These results suggest that later generations of students whose families immigrated to the US may achieve greater academic and financial success, but that income alone is unlikely to result in greater academic achievement. Some reasons for the findings will be discussed.