Presentation Title

Social Norms Surrounding Plastic Surgery

Faculty Mentor

Michael Harnett

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:30 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 9:45 AM

Location

15-1808

Session

Social Science 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Due to advances in technology, the definition of plastic surgery has been transformed in recent years. Our views and opinions of plastic surgery as a society have changed as well, as it is becoming less of a taboo. I studied the social norms behind plastic surgery to investigate which age groups display the most negativity or disapproval towards plastic surgery in order to understand the elemental roots contributing to the judgment surrounding it. I hypothesized that the largest divide in opinion and objection to cosmetic plastic surgery would come from older generations (ages 50+) since the society they were raised in did not normalize plastic surgery as our society does today. My survey, which was posted and shared on Facebook, asked four short questions: How old are you? Have you had cosmetic plastic surgery? How do you feel about cosmetic plastic surgery (against, indifferent, supportive)? Would you consider getting cosmetic plastic surgery in the future? The survey emphasized that the questions pertain to aesthetic enhancement procedures only. The feedback consisted of results from 100 people from a large diversity of age groups. Some bias was expected due to the fact that the results were limited to those in the Los Angeles area that are active on social media; however overall the results were largely consistent with those collected from larger scale studies.

Summary of research results to be presented

The results countered the hypothesis as it concluded that most of the controversy was arising from the younger age groups. Only about 10% of people aged 18-25 indicated indifference towards plastic surgery while the remaining 90% were equally divided between being against or supportive of it. In addition, the majority of those aged 50+ stated that they were indifferent towards plastic surgery. Overall, a slight majority (54%) said they would consider getting plastic surgery in the future. Conditions that may explain these outcomes include social and locational factors. It is estimated that about 90% of people in their twenties can be found on social media. There, influencers speak freely about their invasive procedures, leading some viewers to feel insecure and angry, while others aspire to be the same. Further, due to the fact that all of the respondents live in the Los Angeles area, where we are more exposed to plastic surgery than most other less populated and less socially impacted cities, our views and interpretations of the practice are highly influenced. In addition, plastic surgery is costly and those who live in expensive communities such as those in Los Angeles will more likely be able to afford it. That being said,14% of respondents disclosed that they already have undergone some sort of aesthetic plastic surgery, a statistic that can only be collected in major cities across America.

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Nov 18th, 9:30 AM Nov 18th, 9:45 AM

Social Norms Surrounding Plastic Surgery

15-1808

Due to advances in technology, the definition of plastic surgery has been transformed in recent years. Our views and opinions of plastic surgery as a society have changed as well, as it is becoming less of a taboo. I studied the social norms behind plastic surgery to investigate which age groups display the most negativity or disapproval towards plastic surgery in order to understand the elemental roots contributing to the judgment surrounding it. I hypothesized that the largest divide in opinion and objection to cosmetic plastic surgery would come from older generations (ages 50+) since the society they were raised in did not normalize plastic surgery as our society does today. My survey, which was posted and shared on Facebook, asked four short questions: How old are you? Have you had cosmetic plastic surgery? How do you feel about cosmetic plastic surgery (against, indifferent, supportive)? Would you consider getting cosmetic plastic surgery in the future? The survey emphasized that the questions pertain to aesthetic enhancement procedures only. The feedback consisted of results from 100 people from a large diversity of age groups. Some bias was expected due to the fact that the results were limited to those in the Los Angeles area that are active on social media; however overall the results were largely consistent with those collected from larger scale studies.