Presentation Title

Surveillance For Security Vs. Privacy Rights for Those Being Watched

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Michael Harnett

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 10:15 AM

Location

15-1808

Session

Social Science 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The purpose of my research is to see how body cameras used by police officers affect their interactions with the public, while also examining if privacy rights for those being watched are taken into consideration. My hypothesis is that body cameras will have a positive impact on the behavior of officers. This research draws upon two prior studies done on this topic: “Evaluating the Impact of Officer Body Worn Cameras in the Phoenix Police Department” and “A REPORT ON BODY WORN CAMERAS BY EUGENE P. RAMIREZ”. After several readings of both experiments, I concluded that the use of body cameras significantly reduced prevalence of use-of-force along with citizens’ complaints. The implementation of Body Cameras is currently causing a worldwide debate across groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). The ACLU questions who will have access to the video data, how often will the video data be reviewed, and who will make the final determination on whether a video should be released. After thorough analysis of both studies, it’s concluded that body worn cameras may increase the effectiveness on behavior of officers and reduce number of complaints. As for privacy rights, with proper training and the proper policies in place, the ACLU strives to protect the people and supports the investments in body cameras. This research highlights the importance of body worn cameras for both law enforcement and the community. It allows for a clear picture of what truly happened, it improves the behavior of police officers with the public, and it reduces the number of complaints.

Summary of research results to be presented

Data supporting my hypothesis comes from two main studies on body cameras. The first in depth, internal study on the use of body worn cameras was conducted in Southern California by the City of Rialto Police Department. The research was conducted by Rialto’s Police Chief Tony Farrar during his studies at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. The result of the Rialto Study documents more than a 50 percent reduction in the total number of incidents of use-of-force along with an 87% decrease in citizens’ complaints. Within this study, The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) released its thoughts on the use of body worn cameras in October 2013. In the report entitled Police Body-Mounted Cameras: With Right Policies in Place, a Win for All, the ACLU states their concerns and recommendations for the proper use of these cameras. The second broad study of body camera use done by the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) indicated that among the 254 surveyed police agencies in 2013, 75 percent do not currently use body worn cameras while only 63 agencies (25 percent) currently do. These results confirm my hypothesis and call for further study on this ongoing issue.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 10:15 AM

Surveillance For Security Vs. Privacy Rights for Those Being Watched

15-1808

The purpose of my research is to see how body cameras used by police officers affect their interactions with the public, while also examining if privacy rights for those being watched are taken into consideration. My hypothesis is that body cameras will have a positive impact on the behavior of officers. This research draws upon two prior studies done on this topic: “Evaluating the Impact of Officer Body Worn Cameras in the Phoenix Police Department” and “A REPORT ON BODY WORN CAMERAS BY EUGENE P. RAMIREZ”. After several readings of both experiments, I concluded that the use of body cameras significantly reduced prevalence of use-of-force along with citizens’ complaints. The implementation of Body Cameras is currently causing a worldwide debate across groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). The ACLU questions who will have access to the video data, how often will the video data be reviewed, and who will make the final determination on whether a video should be released. After thorough analysis of both studies, it’s concluded that body worn cameras may increase the effectiveness on behavior of officers and reduce number of complaints. As for privacy rights, with proper training and the proper policies in place, the ACLU strives to protect the people and supports the investments in body cameras. This research highlights the importance of body worn cameras for both law enforcement and the community. It allows for a clear picture of what truly happened, it improves the behavior of police officers with the public, and it reduces the number of complaints.