Presentation Title

Mental Health Issues of Ethnic Minorities

Faculty Mentor

HyeSun Lee

Start Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:45 PM

Location

15-1808

Session

Social Science 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The importance of mental health is often ignored because the symptoms usually cannot be seen. Ignoring mental health issues seems more common among ethnic minorities, although a larger number of them suffer from mental health issues (Snowden & Cheung, 1990). Literature stated that stigma imposed by culture can be a potential reason (e.g., Cai & Robst, 2016) and ethnic minority undergraduates underuse psychological services due to the stigma (e.g., Cheng et al., 2013). As an initial step to examine the effects of stigma embedded in minority cultures, we investigated whether self-reported status about mental health differs across three ethnic groups (White, Black, and Hispanic) by using the data from the National Health Interview Survey Series (1980-2013). Mental health issues related to the duration of emotional and mental problems were investigated across the groups at two time points (2003 and 2013). Results from ANOVA analyses revealed that Hispanics and Blacks tend to report shorter periods of mental health problems compared to Whites in both years, and more prominently in 2013. The current findings lead us to expand research focus to the psychological process of minorities in response to the self-report mental health questionnaires. The potential mechanism in the self-report process may be related to cultural stigmas surrounding mental health issues. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research is conducting cognitive lab interviews to identify the psychological process. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

We investigated whether self-reported status about mental health differs across three ethnic groups (White, Black, and Hispanic) by using the data from the National Health Interview Survey Series (1980-2013). Mental health issues related to the duration of emotional and mental problems were investigated across the groups at two time points (2003 and 2013). Results from ANOVA analyses revealed that Hispanics and Blacks tend to report shorter periods of mental health problems compared to Whites in both years, and more prominently in 2013. The current findings lead us to expand research focus to the psychological process of minorities in response to the self-report mental health questionnaires. The potential mechanism in the self-report process may be related to cultural stigmas surrounding mental health issues. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research is conducting cognitive lab interviews to identify the psychological process. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

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Nov 18th, 1:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:45 PM

Mental Health Issues of Ethnic Minorities

15-1808

The importance of mental health is often ignored because the symptoms usually cannot be seen. Ignoring mental health issues seems more common among ethnic minorities, although a larger number of them suffer from mental health issues (Snowden & Cheung, 1990). Literature stated that stigma imposed by culture can be a potential reason (e.g., Cai & Robst, 2016) and ethnic minority undergraduates underuse psychological services due to the stigma (e.g., Cheng et al., 2013). As an initial step to examine the effects of stigma embedded in minority cultures, we investigated whether self-reported status about mental health differs across three ethnic groups (White, Black, and Hispanic) by using the data from the National Health Interview Survey Series (1980-2013). Mental health issues related to the duration of emotional and mental problems were investigated across the groups at two time points (2003 and 2013). Results from ANOVA analyses revealed that Hispanics and Blacks tend to report shorter periods of mental health problems compared to Whites in both years, and more prominently in 2013. The current findings lead us to expand research focus to the psychological process of minorities in response to the self-report mental health questionnaires. The potential mechanism in the self-report process may be related to cultural stigmas surrounding mental health issues. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research is conducting cognitive lab interviews to identify the psychological process. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.