Presentation Title

Understanding the Perceptions of Promiscuity - How a Woman's Exposed Skin Influences Impression Formation

Faculty Mentor

Chara Powell

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:30 AM

Location

15-1807

Session

Social Science 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to identify the effects of promiscuity as a first impression in order to identify the impact of a participant’s perception of female promiscuity. The ease of access to online dating, like Tinder, Bumble, OkCupid, etc has presented an array of dating assortments. It allows users to rate prospective partners quickly, within 3 to 7 seconds, as attractive or not, based on the short and rapid glimpses of their profile pictures. The research team recruited 49 participants, whom were students at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, California. The participants self-selected themselves into one of two groups, participants in Group A viewed an image of a young female model, Lexi, who showed more exposed skin, cleavage, form fitting clothes and was purposely portrayed as promiscuous. While Group B was shown a picture of a model with less skin showing and was purposely portrayed as non-promiscuous. In picture A the women wore a shirt that exposed her cleavage accompanied with tight white shorts, compared to picture B in which she wore a regular shirt that showed no cleavage, accompanied with loose white shorts. The research team hypothesized that participants in Group A would rate Lexi as more promiscuous than in Group B which students perceived as less promiscuous. Participants were given Likert statements such as, “I believe that Lexi is a person who would have multiple sexual partners” to measure the level of promiscuity on a scale of 1-5 with scores ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree.

Summary of research results to be presented

  • In order to measure the participant’s perception of promiscuity, an independent samples t-test analysis was conducted on multiple dependent variables based on attire.
  • results showed that there was a significant difference in provocativeness between Group A (M=3.1364) and Group B (M=1.7037), t(47)=5.846, p < .05.
  • team also found a significant difference in the perception of whether the model was dressed inappropriately between Group A (M=2.5455) and Group B (M=1.7037), t(47)=2.992, p < .05.
  • The research team did not find a significant difference for Q3 between Group A (M=2.3636) and Group B (M=2.3333), t(47)=0.103, p > .05.
  • the research team did not find a significant difference in the participants willingness to date Lexi between Group A (M=1.9091) and Group B (M=1.8889), t(47)=0.059, p > .05.

The results prove that societal views of individuals who dress provocatively are perceived as more “inappropriate” and “provocative” than their fellow cohorts.

Among a student cohort, women are subjugated less by males and females based on the type of clothing they wear and the fashion style has no direct relationship to perceived sexual activity.

While Model A was significantly proven to appear more provocatively, this did not have a significant impact on whether or not participants were willing to date her, meaning that Model A’s provocative fashion-style did not play a significant role in acquiring more dates nor appearing as to having more sexual partners when compared to Model B’s non-provocative outfit.

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Nov 18th, 11:15 AM Nov 18th, 11:30 AM

Understanding the Perceptions of Promiscuity - How a Woman's Exposed Skin Influences Impression Formation

15-1807

The purpose of the study was to identify the effects of promiscuity as a first impression in order to identify the impact of a participant’s perception of female promiscuity. The ease of access to online dating, like Tinder, Bumble, OkCupid, etc has presented an array of dating assortments. It allows users to rate prospective partners quickly, within 3 to 7 seconds, as attractive or not, based on the short and rapid glimpses of their profile pictures. The research team recruited 49 participants, whom were students at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, California. The participants self-selected themselves into one of two groups, participants in Group A viewed an image of a young female model, Lexi, who showed more exposed skin, cleavage, form fitting clothes and was purposely portrayed as promiscuous. While Group B was shown a picture of a model with less skin showing and was purposely portrayed as non-promiscuous. In picture A the women wore a shirt that exposed her cleavage accompanied with tight white shorts, compared to picture B in which she wore a regular shirt that showed no cleavage, accompanied with loose white shorts. The research team hypothesized that participants in Group A would rate Lexi as more promiscuous than in Group B which students perceived as less promiscuous. Participants were given Likert statements such as, “I believe that Lexi is a person who would have multiple sexual partners” to measure the level of promiscuity on a scale of 1-5 with scores ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree.