Presentation Title

Diversity Within: Exploring the Health Outcomes of Mexicans and other Central Americans living in the United States

Presenter Information

Allyson CarranzaFollow

Faculty Mentor

Luis Sanchez

Start Date

18-11-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 2:15 PM

Location

15-1807

Session

Social Science 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

My study examines Latino health disparities with a particular focus on Latino subgroups including Mexicans and Salvadorans living in the United States. . Over the past few decades the demographic category “Hispanic” has evolved drastically. In the 1930s US Census, Mexican was the only category representing the Hispanic population. Although Mexicans remain the largest Latino group in the U.S., some of the fastest growing and emerging groups are from other parts of Central America, such as Salvadorans and Guatemalans. According to a previous study, immigrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras account for nearly 90% of total population growth since 1980 (Lesser 2017). However, many studies that examine racial and ethnic health disparities tend to explore Latinos as one population although groups such as Salvadorans and Guatemalans have a different lived experience, migration and incorporation, than more established groups such as Mexicans. I will be conducting a secondary data analysis using the American Time Use Survey, a nationally representative survey that contains a significant sample of Salvadoran and other Central American immigrants. In particular, I plan to compare various health outcomes, such as general health, exercise, and nutrition across Latino subgroups. Furthermore, I will explore how group differences in health outcomes might be explained by other factors such as education, income, and citizenship status. My preliminary findings demonstrate that Salvadoran and “other’ Central American respondents report higher levels of general health compared to Mexican respondents. Considering this comparison, it is imperative to understand the differences between Latino subgroups in regards to overall health and explore the possible factors contributing to these differences.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 2:00 PM Nov 18th, 2:15 PM

Diversity Within: Exploring the Health Outcomes of Mexicans and other Central Americans living in the United States

15-1807

My study examines Latino health disparities with a particular focus on Latino subgroups including Mexicans and Salvadorans living in the United States. . Over the past few decades the demographic category “Hispanic” has evolved drastically. In the 1930s US Census, Mexican was the only category representing the Hispanic population. Although Mexicans remain the largest Latino group in the U.S., some of the fastest growing and emerging groups are from other parts of Central America, such as Salvadorans and Guatemalans. According to a previous study, immigrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras account for nearly 90% of total population growth since 1980 (Lesser 2017). However, many studies that examine racial and ethnic health disparities tend to explore Latinos as one population although groups such as Salvadorans and Guatemalans have a different lived experience, migration and incorporation, than more established groups such as Mexicans. I will be conducting a secondary data analysis using the American Time Use Survey, a nationally representative survey that contains a significant sample of Salvadoran and other Central American immigrants. In particular, I plan to compare various health outcomes, such as general health, exercise, and nutrition across Latino subgroups. Furthermore, I will explore how group differences in health outcomes might be explained by other factors such as education, income, and citizenship status. My preliminary findings demonstrate that Salvadoran and “other’ Central American respondents report higher levels of general health compared to Mexican respondents. Considering this comparison, it is imperative to understand the differences between Latino subgroups in regards to overall health and explore the possible factors contributing to these differences.