Presentation Title

Feeling a Lack of Support: Accessibility to Single-Parents of Children with Special Needs

Faculty Mentor

HyeSun Lee

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:45 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

Location

15-1822

Session

Social Science 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Literature indicated that occupational therapy is beneficial for young children with special needs; children receiving occupational therapy at young age develop appropriate motor skills (Watkins et al., 2014). However, therapeutic services have not been easily accessible to single parents, leading them to feel a lack of support for their children (Ziviani et al., 2014). Focusing on this issue, we investigated five factors affecting feelings of lack of support by using data from the Parent Survey: Challenges for Low Income Families (Ward, Helen, & Morris, 2002-2005). The five predictors were parent’s marital status (PMS), whether the child has social or behavioral problems (CSBP), whether the parent has ever quit working (PQJ), how often the parent is disrupted at work to meet their child's needs (PDW), and if the child receives special services (CRSS). The results from a logistic regression analysis revealed that CSBP, PQJ, and PDW were significant, as expected. Interestingly, PMS was significant only for young children, and CRSS was nonsignificant. Related to potential reasons of the current findings, claims from previous studies (e.g., Loprest & Davidoff, 2004) can be considered; making an extra effort to receive special services seems challenging for low-income single parents, leading them to feel lack of support. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research expands the focus of research to alternative approaches which can improve accessibility to therapeutic services for single-parents. In addition to research the research findings, the presentation will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

We investigated five factors affecting feelings of lack of support by using data from the Parent Survey: Challenges for Low Income Families (Ward, Helen, & Morris, 2002-2005). The five predictors were parent’s marital status (PMS), whether the child has social or behavioral problems (CSBP), whether the parent has ever quit working (PQJ), how often the parent is disrupted at work to meet their child's needs (PDW), and if the child receives special services (CRSS). The results from a logistic regression analysis revealed that CSBP, PQJ, and PDW were significant, as expected. Interestingly, PMS was significant only for young children, and CRSS was nonsignificant. Related to potential reasons of the current findings, claims from previous studies (e.g., Loprest & Davidoff, 2004) can be considered; making an extra effort to receive special services seems challenging for low-income single parents, leading them to feel lack of support. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research expands the focus of research to alternative approaches which can improve accessibility to therapeutic services for single-parents. In addition to research the research findings, the presentation will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 9:45 AM Nov 18th, 10:00 AM

Feeling a Lack of Support: Accessibility to Single-Parents of Children with Special Needs

15-1822

Literature indicated that occupational therapy is beneficial for young children with special needs; children receiving occupational therapy at young age develop appropriate motor skills (Watkins et al., 2014). However, therapeutic services have not been easily accessible to single parents, leading them to feel a lack of support for their children (Ziviani et al., 2014). Focusing on this issue, we investigated five factors affecting feelings of lack of support by using data from the Parent Survey: Challenges for Low Income Families (Ward, Helen, & Morris, 2002-2005). The five predictors were parent’s marital status (PMS), whether the child has social or behavioral problems (CSBP), whether the parent has ever quit working (PQJ), how often the parent is disrupted at work to meet their child's needs (PDW), and if the child receives special services (CRSS). The results from a logistic regression analysis revealed that CSBP, PQJ, and PDW were significant, as expected. Interestingly, PMS was significant only for young children, and CRSS was nonsignificant. Related to potential reasons of the current findings, claims from previous studies (e.g., Loprest & Davidoff, 2004) can be considered; making an extra effort to receive special services seems challenging for low-income single parents, leading them to feel lack of support. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research expands the focus of research to alternative approaches which can improve accessibility to therapeutic services for single-parents. In addition to research the research findings, the presentation will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.