Presentation Title

Parental Involvement on Academic Achievement in Dual-Language Immersion Programs

Faculty Mentor

Sue Sy, Kathleen Preston

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:30 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 9:45 AM

Location

15-1822

Session

Social Science 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In recent years, schools in the United States increasingly began to implement dual language immersion (DLI) programs. DLI programs are defined as programs that focus on developing students’ proficiency in two languages, to promote biliteracy and bilingualism. Empirically, both DLI programs and parental involvement have been found to relate to students’ academic achievements; therefore, the current study sought to explore the relationship between home activities, a form of parental involvement, and students’ academic performance in DLI programs.

Across curriculums, research has shown that students in DLI programs outperform their peers academically (Thomas & Collier, 1997). Similarly, previous studies have found relevant parental involvement in the form of home activities, such as reading books to child or practicing writing numbers with child, to be positively related to students’ literacy and numeracy, respectively (Skwarchuk, Sowinski, and LeFevre, 2014). The current study examines the effect of home activities on academic achievements for students in DLI, or two-way programs compared to students in one-way programs, which focus on developing literacy solely in English.

The sample of the study comprised 1,235 non-native English speaking second grade students from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 2010-2011 (ECLS-K:2011), which is nationally representative of students from kindergarten to second grade. Analyses of the students’ academic achievement revealed that home activities, specifically, reading to children in a non-English language, had a combined effect with enrollment of DLI programs that accounted for academic achievement. Replicating previous findings, we also found that both enrollment in DLI programs and level of home activities predicted academic performance. These findings suggest that in addition to the benefits that DLI programs offer to students whose primary language is not English, students’ academic achievement can also be influenced by parents reading non-English material.

Summary of research results to be presented

Multiple regressions were conducted to examine the relationship between academic performance and: (a) enrollment in DLI programs; (b) level of home activity; and (c) the combined effect of enrollment in DLI programs and home activities. Results revealed that enrollment in DLI programs uniquely predicted academic performance in reading. Parental involvement in the form of home activities also predicted academic performance. Specifically, parental involvement in activities such as reading books in non-English languages and having children read to themselves or others also predicted academic performance. Lastly, enrollment in DLI programs and parent involvement of home activities, specifically reading to child in non-English, had a combined effect on academic performance. Replicating previous findings, results of the current study suggest that enrollment in DLI programs and level of home activities each account for academic performance. Additionally, the interaction effect of parents reading non-English material to their child and students’ enrollment in DLI programs on academic performance suggests that facilitating certain home activities for students in DLI programs may have an influence on these students’ academic performance.

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Nov 18th, 9:30 AM Nov 18th, 9:45 AM

Parental Involvement on Academic Achievement in Dual-Language Immersion Programs

15-1822

In recent years, schools in the United States increasingly began to implement dual language immersion (DLI) programs. DLI programs are defined as programs that focus on developing students’ proficiency in two languages, to promote biliteracy and bilingualism. Empirically, both DLI programs and parental involvement have been found to relate to students’ academic achievements; therefore, the current study sought to explore the relationship between home activities, a form of parental involvement, and students’ academic performance in DLI programs.

Across curriculums, research has shown that students in DLI programs outperform their peers academically (Thomas & Collier, 1997). Similarly, previous studies have found relevant parental involvement in the form of home activities, such as reading books to child or practicing writing numbers with child, to be positively related to students’ literacy and numeracy, respectively (Skwarchuk, Sowinski, and LeFevre, 2014). The current study examines the effect of home activities on academic achievements for students in DLI, or two-way programs compared to students in one-way programs, which focus on developing literacy solely in English.

The sample of the study comprised 1,235 non-native English speaking second grade students from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 2010-2011 (ECLS-K:2011), which is nationally representative of students from kindergarten to second grade. Analyses of the students’ academic achievement revealed that home activities, specifically, reading to children in a non-English language, had a combined effect with enrollment of DLI programs that accounted for academic achievement. Replicating previous findings, we also found that both enrollment in DLI programs and level of home activities predicted academic performance. These findings suggest that in addition to the benefits that DLI programs offer to students whose primary language is not English, students’ academic achievement can also be influenced by parents reading non-English material.