Presentation Title

Underlying Psychological Process: Neuroticism as a Mediator for Job Satisfaction

Faculty Mentor

HyeSun Lee

Start Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:15 AM

Location

15-1814

Session

Social Science 4

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Finding a balance between work and family roles can often be demanding task. Dealing with situations in which work obligations interfere with family life or vice versa can often take its toll on a person. Related to work and family conflicts, findings from Armstrong, Atkin-Plunk, and Wells (2015) indicated a negative correlation between work-family conflict and job satisfaction, and Rantanen et al. revealed a positive relationship between neuroticism and work-family conflict in both men and women. Expanding on previous studies, the current research examined the relationship of work-family conflict and job satisfaction with the focus on the role of neuroticism as a mediator for the relationship by using the data, Professional Worker Career Experience Survey-United States (Rosenbloom & Ash, 2003-2004). The results from a mediation analysis with a bootstrapping approach showed significant direct and indirect effects. Different from findings in Bouchard and Poirier (2011), fathers with high levels of neuroticism experienced more work-family conflict and lower levels of well-being, whereas no relationship was found in mothers, gender was not a significant moderator in the current study. Based on the current findings, we expand the focus of research to the relative mediational effect of each subcomponent in neuroticism on job satisfaction. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research is collecting data about subcomponents in neuroticism, work-family conflicts, and job satisfaction to identify the mediational process in neuroticism. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

The results from a mediation analysis with a bootstrapping approach showed significant direct and indirect effects. Different from findings in Bouchard and Poirier (2011), fathers with high levels of neuroticism experienced more work-family conflict and lower levels of well-being, whereas no relationship was found in mothers, gender was not a significant moderator in the current study. Based on the current findings, we expand the focus of research to the relative mediational effect of each subcomponent in neuroticism on job satisfaction. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research is collecting data about subcomponents in neuroticism, work-family conflicts, and job satisfaction to identify the mediational process in neuroticism. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 11:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:15 AM

Underlying Psychological Process: Neuroticism as a Mediator for Job Satisfaction

15-1814

Finding a balance between work and family roles can often be demanding task. Dealing with situations in which work obligations interfere with family life or vice versa can often take its toll on a person. Related to work and family conflicts, findings from Armstrong, Atkin-Plunk, and Wells (2015) indicated a negative correlation between work-family conflict and job satisfaction, and Rantanen et al. revealed a positive relationship between neuroticism and work-family conflict in both men and women. Expanding on previous studies, the current research examined the relationship of work-family conflict and job satisfaction with the focus on the role of neuroticism as a mediator for the relationship by using the data, Professional Worker Career Experience Survey-United States (Rosenbloom & Ash, 2003-2004). The results from a mediation analysis with a bootstrapping approach showed significant direct and indirect effects. Different from findings in Bouchard and Poirier (2011), fathers with high levels of neuroticism experienced more work-family conflict and lower levels of well-being, whereas no relationship was found in mothers, gender was not a significant moderator in the current study. Based on the current findings, we expand the focus of research to the relative mediational effect of each subcomponent in neuroticism on job satisfaction. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research is collecting data about subcomponents in neuroticism, work-family conflicts, and job satisfaction to identify the mediational process in neuroticism. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.