Presentation Title

3D Microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Devices For Colorimetric Bioassays

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Frank A. Gomez

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:15 AM

Location

Markstein 203

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Microfluidic techniques have been incorporated in many fields due to their portability, compatibility, ability to multiplex, speed to analysis, and ability to analyze samples at low expenses. Microfluidic devices (MDs) can reduce time, reagents, and the complexity of previous lab techniques. The use of paper in MDs has been demonstrated to give promising results in point-of-care (POC) diagnostics due to their small volume requirements, portability, low cost, and technique compatibility. Herein, we describe the development and use of 3D microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (3D-µPADs) to detect glucose and assess acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity via colorimetric-based assays. The devices consisted of multi-wax-printed paper. Saturation curves were generated by flowing reagents through the devices via capillary action and subsequently drying, scanning, and analyzing yielding a correlation between color intensity and substrate concentration. Studies to quantitate glucose in artificial urine showed good correlation using the devices. The use of 3D-based devices incorporating paper for POC diagnostic devices is a viable alternative to more expensive microfluidic-based patterning techniques. The ease of fabricating 3D MDs demonstrates the potential for developing other devices and for multiple analytes simultaneously.

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Nov 23rd, 9:00 AM Nov 23rd, 9:15 AM

3D Microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Devices For Colorimetric Bioassays

Markstein 203

Microfluidic techniques have been incorporated in many fields due to their portability, compatibility, ability to multiplex, speed to analysis, and ability to analyze samples at low expenses. Microfluidic devices (MDs) can reduce time, reagents, and the complexity of previous lab techniques. The use of paper in MDs has been demonstrated to give promising results in point-of-care (POC) diagnostics due to their small volume requirements, portability, low cost, and technique compatibility. Herein, we describe the development and use of 3D microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (3D-µPADs) to detect glucose and assess acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity via colorimetric-based assays. The devices consisted of multi-wax-printed paper. Saturation curves were generated by flowing reagents through the devices via capillary action and subsequently drying, scanning, and analyzing yielding a correlation between color intensity and substrate concentration. Studies to quantitate glucose in artificial urine showed good correlation using the devices. The use of 3D-based devices incorporating paper for POC diagnostic devices is a viable alternative to more expensive microfluidic-based patterning techniques. The ease of fabricating 3D MDs demonstrates the potential for developing other devices and for multiple analytes simultaneously.