Presentation Title

The Challenges & Opportunities for the Retail Worker in Higher Education

Faculty Mentor

Christian B. Teeter, Ed.D.

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:15 AM

Location

Markstein 209

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Retail careers provide flexible, multifaceted opportunities for workers. Many retail employees in the United States lack a college degree, and salary levels for retail staff across the country remain at lower levels compared to other professional career tracks. In spite of the lower salaries in the sector, many retail workers opt to not pursue higher education, regardless of the financial benefits that are associated with earning a college degree. Using a social capital theoretical framework, this case study, focused on primary research with Southern California supermarket retail staff, develops a discussion of the major reasons why retail workers do not pursue higher education and makes recommendations to employers and policy makers about ways in which this important segment of the labor force can receive more information about the opportunities and benefits that higher education affords.

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Nov 23rd, 9:00 AM Nov 23rd, 9:15 AM

The Challenges & Opportunities for the Retail Worker in Higher Education

Markstein 209

Retail careers provide flexible, multifaceted opportunities for workers. Many retail employees in the United States lack a college degree, and salary levels for retail staff across the country remain at lower levels compared to other professional career tracks. In spite of the lower salaries in the sector, many retail workers opt to not pursue higher education, regardless of the financial benefits that are associated with earning a college degree. Using a social capital theoretical framework, this case study, focused on primary research with Southern California supermarket retail staff, develops a discussion of the major reasons why retail workers do not pursue higher education and makes recommendations to employers and policy makers about ways in which this important segment of the labor force can receive more information about the opportunities and benefits that higher education affords.