Presentation Title

Therapeutic Cardiothread production for Heart Therapy with a 3D Printed CAD Assembler Device Which Binds Stem Cells to Suture using Fibrin and Gelatin

Faculty Mentor

Dr. James Harber

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

Location

Markstein 210

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

This project aims to improve the methods for producing heart cells from stem cells that can be used to create cell-coated suture for applications to heal a heart damaged by disease or injury. This living surgical grade living suture termed “Cardiothread” has been produced for three years in the lab and is intended to be a tool to bridge damaged areas of the heart. Some applications of cardiothread are intended to be in healing suture transplanted blood veins/arteries after myocardial infarction, improve repair of xenograph porcine tissue for valve replacement, and bridge torn or damaged tissue directly or in conjunction with heart tissue patches produced by transdifferentiation technologies of the patients own cells. A major barrier exists in loading the patient’s stem cells/skin cells to be differentiated/transdifferentiated onto the collagen suture. The hypothesis of this experiment is that a device termed the “Cardiothread Assembler” could be used to add gelatin, cells, fibrinogen, and thrombin to a suture in a flow-through sequence onto a newly designed device produced by CAD and printed in 3D. This mechanical device takes standard sterilized suture stock thread from an origin “spindle” on one end of the assembler through a dipping process to add cells and other binding factors and spooled on a destination “bobbin”. The bobbin with the living thread wrapped on it is removed and cultivated in a standard 6-well tissue culture dish for differentiation into beating heart cells. The model system chosen for proof of principle is utilizes differentiating P19.CL6 mouse pluripotent cells on the suture into cardiac cells in the presence of 1% DMSO. Furthermore, when the prepared bobbin is cultured in the six-well petri dish, a novel newly designed pacemaker sends an electric current along platinum wire through a modified culture dish lid to the bobbin. This further stimulates uniform beating and growth of cardiomyocytes on the suture prior to its use in surgery. The results of the experiment showed that this approach is feasible. More experiments are needed to confirm that even and continuous growth of the cells on the suture has occurred. Quality control metrics for producing Cardiothread is currently manually recorded and monitored using a dissecting microscope. Software to evaluate the thickness of the cell coating and speed at which the thread passes through each stage of the “assembler” processes is a future objective.

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Nov 23rd, 9:45 AM Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM

Therapeutic Cardiothread production for Heart Therapy with a 3D Printed CAD Assembler Device Which Binds Stem Cells to Suture using Fibrin and Gelatin

Markstein 210

This project aims to improve the methods for producing heart cells from stem cells that can be used to create cell-coated suture for applications to heal a heart damaged by disease or injury. This living surgical grade living suture termed “Cardiothread” has been produced for three years in the lab and is intended to be a tool to bridge damaged areas of the heart. Some applications of cardiothread are intended to be in healing suture transplanted blood veins/arteries after myocardial infarction, improve repair of xenograph porcine tissue for valve replacement, and bridge torn or damaged tissue directly or in conjunction with heart tissue patches produced by transdifferentiation technologies of the patients own cells. A major barrier exists in loading the patient’s stem cells/skin cells to be differentiated/transdifferentiated onto the collagen suture. The hypothesis of this experiment is that a device termed the “Cardiothread Assembler” could be used to add gelatin, cells, fibrinogen, and thrombin to a suture in a flow-through sequence onto a newly designed device produced by CAD and printed in 3D. This mechanical device takes standard sterilized suture stock thread from an origin “spindle” on one end of the assembler through a dipping process to add cells and other binding factors and spooled on a destination “bobbin”. The bobbin with the living thread wrapped on it is removed and cultivated in a standard 6-well tissue culture dish for differentiation into beating heart cells. The model system chosen for proof of principle is utilizes differentiating P19.CL6 mouse pluripotent cells on the suture into cardiac cells in the presence of 1% DMSO. Furthermore, when the prepared bobbin is cultured in the six-well petri dish, a novel newly designed pacemaker sends an electric current along platinum wire through a modified culture dish lid to the bobbin. This further stimulates uniform beating and growth of cardiomyocytes on the suture prior to its use in surgery. The results of the experiment showed that this approach is feasible. More experiments are needed to confirm that even and continuous growth of the cells on the suture has occurred. Quality control metrics for producing Cardiothread is currently manually recorded and monitored using a dissecting microscope. Software to evaluate the thickness of the cell coating and speed at which the thread passes through each stage of the “assembler” processes is a future objective.