Presentation Title

A Case for Reforming Structural Linguistic Biases: Gender in English

Presenter Information

Marmar TavasolFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Katherine Gasdaglis, Dr. Peter Ross, Dr. Alex Madva

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:15 AM

Location

Markstein 211

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Expressions can carry problematic hidden implications. I argue that the hidden implications that are deeply embedded in language are most problematic because they are frequently used and the harmful effects are not easily recognized, specifically, looking at why expressions of gendered language is problematic, as they (i) are difficult to find and address in everyday language, (ii) may act as a vehicle for dog-whistling, (iii) violate the privacy of the person being mentioned by disclosing their gender, and (iv) lead to confusion and exclusion. After discussing the problems, I argue for specific approaches in reforming language that should be applied in structural and individual ways. I further develop arguments for addressing other types of hidden implications embedded in language outside of gender in English. Lastly, I consider the strongest objections to my view, namely, the concern with gender expression through language, and prioritizing other forms of reform.

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Nov 23rd, 9:00 AM Nov 23rd, 9:15 AM

A Case for Reforming Structural Linguistic Biases: Gender in English

Markstein 211

Expressions can carry problematic hidden implications. I argue that the hidden implications that are deeply embedded in language are most problematic because they are frequently used and the harmful effects are not easily recognized, specifically, looking at why expressions of gendered language is problematic, as they (i) are difficult to find and address in everyday language, (ii) may act as a vehicle for dog-whistling, (iii) violate the privacy of the person being mentioned by disclosing their gender, and (iv) lead to confusion and exclusion. After discussing the problems, I argue for specific approaches in reforming language that should be applied in structural and individual ways. I further develop arguments for addressing other types of hidden implications embedded in language outside of gender in English. Lastly, I consider the strongest objections to my view, namely, the concern with gender expression through language, and prioritizing other forms of reform.