Presentation Title

Pablo Picasso and Rolando Villazón: Ethnographic Case Studies in Spanish and Latin American Immigration to France

Presenter Information

Cayde NewtonFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Michael James

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:45 AM

Location

Markstein 213

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Pablo Picasso and Rolando Villazón are two of the most prolific artists to have established the bulk of their careers in France, and both emigrated from Spanish-speaking countries to better pursue their respective art forms. This essay uses existing literature and the words of both men to analyze the history and evolution of relations and stereotypes between Spain, Mexico, and France; and furthermore, the personal and professional development of each artist and how their growth, thoughts, and experiences fit into a larger picture of Spanish and Latino cultural acclimation to France and France’s increasing acceptance of Spanish and Latino emigrants. The historical French sentiment towards Spanish-speaking people groups has changed dramatically over the last several decades as evidenced by media and demographic shifts, and there are a variety of political and socioeconomic sources of this change. This change of sentiment, as well as the corresponding increase in cultural interest and opportunity for upward mobility of Spanish-speaking emigrants within French society, have served to offer hundreds of thousands of Spanish and Latino immigrants the opportunity for a better life in France.

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Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM Nov 23rd, 9:45 AM

Pablo Picasso and Rolando Villazón: Ethnographic Case Studies in Spanish and Latin American Immigration to France

Markstein 213

Pablo Picasso and Rolando Villazón are two of the most prolific artists to have established the bulk of their careers in France, and both emigrated from Spanish-speaking countries to better pursue their respective art forms. This essay uses existing literature and the words of both men to analyze the history and evolution of relations and stereotypes between Spain, Mexico, and France; and furthermore, the personal and professional development of each artist and how their growth, thoughts, and experiences fit into a larger picture of Spanish and Latino cultural acclimation to France and France’s increasing acceptance of Spanish and Latino emigrants. The historical French sentiment towards Spanish-speaking people groups has changed dramatically over the last several decades as evidenced by media and demographic shifts, and there are a variety of political and socioeconomic sources of this change. This change of sentiment, as well as the corresponding increase in cultural interest and opportunity for upward mobility of Spanish-speaking emigrants within French society, have served to offer hundreds of thousands of Spanish and Latino immigrants the opportunity for a better life in France.