Presentation Title

Children of Latinx Immigrants: Music Binding Two Cultures

Faculty Mentor

2

Start Date

23-11-2019 9:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

Location

Markstein 213

Session

oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Children of Latinx Immigrants: Music Binding Two Cultures

Rosa Isela Reyna Secaida, and Jayson Beaster-Jones, PhD

School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts, University of California, Merced

Semi-structured interviews with children of Latinx immigrants discovered an important relationship between music and the integration of two cultures. Participants expressed feelings of being torn between two cultures, being told they are not “American” enough or “Latino” enough. Music helped in binding both of their cultures, mostly through language. Speaking Spanish is an important marker of identity and is vital to music representing and creating a hybrid culture.

My data revealed a connection between music, the participants cultures, and identity. Participants stated having two cultures; inheriting their parents’ cultures and being born in America. They described music as holding memories and bringing them back to their culture while connecting them to their parents’ stories and homelands. Participants also suggested that any music connects any two cultures. The interviews revealed that music brings two cultures together and expresses individuals’ identities.

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Nov 23rd, 9:45 AM Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM

Children of Latinx Immigrants: Music Binding Two Cultures

Markstein 213

Children of Latinx Immigrants: Music Binding Two Cultures

Rosa Isela Reyna Secaida, and Jayson Beaster-Jones, PhD

School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts, University of California, Merced

Semi-structured interviews with children of Latinx immigrants discovered an important relationship between music and the integration of two cultures. Participants expressed feelings of being torn between two cultures, being told they are not “American” enough or “Latino” enough. Music helped in binding both of their cultures, mostly through language. Speaking Spanish is an important marker of identity and is vital to music representing and creating a hybrid culture.

My data revealed a connection between music, the participants cultures, and identity. Participants stated having two cultures; inheriting their parents’ cultures and being born in America. They described music as holding memories and bringing them back to their culture while connecting them to their parents’ stories and homelands. Participants also suggested that any music connects any two cultures. The interviews revealed that music brings two cultures together and expresses individuals’ identities.